Archive for July, 2020

July 25, 2020

The Aosawa Murders by Riku Onda

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Bitter Lemon Press, £8.99, out now

This might be the best mysterRiku Onda THE AOSAWA MURDERS.jpgy I’ve ever read.  I immediately reread it and liked it even better second time around.

A prominent local family host a party at their smart villa in a seaside town in 1970s Japan.  Seventeen people are poisoned and only one member of the family survives: teenage Hisako, a blind girl.  Hisako claims that all she can remember is a blue room, and a flower.

Convinced that she is guilty of murder, a local police inspector tries for years to prove it.  But an easier suspect takes his own life, and people start to move on.  A gathering together of multiple forms of testimony helps to find an answer at last.

The Aosawa Murders is made up of witness accounts, stories and other ‘found’ testimony.  You read along, almost as an investigator yourself, and the process is extraordinarily engrossing.  It reminded me of the things I liked best about Graham Macrae Burnet’s His Bloody Project, but ultimately it’s not really like anything else (https://riversidebookshop.co.uk/2016/09/07/his-bloody-project-by-graeme-macrae-burnet/).

Riku Onda’s writing is beautiful and the translation seamless.  The setting is so vivid it becomes a character in itself: “But the ocean here isn’t refreshing at all.  Gazing at it doesn’t give you any sense of freedom or relief.  And the horizon is always close, as if waiting for an opportunity to force its way onto land.  It feels like you’re being watched, and if you dare look away for just a moment the sea might descend upon you.” (p. 14)

The need to reread immediately is a reflection of the intricate and satisfying plot.  I suspected I could make more connections by having a second pass of the evidence, and I did.

The book literally gave me chills.  There were a couple of moments where I gasped aloud.  It’s both understated and electrifying and I’m still not sure how the author achieves this.  The Aosawa Murders has opened up a whole world of Japanese crime writing for me.  I went straight on to read The Tokyo Zodiac Murders by Soji Shimada.  I will never forget The Aosawa Murders.

Review by Bethan

July 21, 2020

Re-opening bestsellers

by Team Riverside

bestsellers 210720.jpg.jpegOur bestselling books, from 7 July to today 21 July:

1. Girl, Woman, Other – Bernardine Evaristo

2. Why I’m no Longer Talking to White People about Race – Reni Eddo-Lodge

3. My Name is Why – Lemn Sissay

4. Three Women – Lisa Taddeo

5. Talking to Strangers – Malcolm Gladwell

6. Utopia Avenue – David Mitchell

7. Black and British – David Olusoga

8. Machines Like Me – Ian McEwan

9. Normal People – Sally Rooney

10. City of Girls – Elizabeth Gilbert

11. Humankind: a Hopeful History – Rutger Bregman

12. Queenie – Candice Carty-Williams

13. Too Much and Never Enough – Mary L. Trump

14. Swimming in the Dark – Tomasz Jedrowski

15. Mouth Full of Blood – Toni Morrison

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July 19, 2020

Meesha Makes Friends by Tom Percival

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Bloomsbury, £6.99, out nowTom Perceval MEESHA MAKES FRIENDS

Meesha has a loving family and a joyful and creative spirit, but she finds it hard to make friends.  This latest picture book in Tom Percival’s Big Bright Feelings series deals with this common experience sensitively and with helpful practical suggestions.

Appropriate for infants and up, the gorgeous illustrations show how the world can be a little monochrome when we feel alone.  Meesha makes her own toy friends out of bits and pieces, but finds that while they are very compliant, they are not much fun to play catch with!

The feelings of being alone in a crowd, and of lacking the skills to get involved with what other children are enjoying, are explored in an accessible way than many (including adults) will be able to relate to.

When someone takes a risk to come and talk to Meesha, will she be able to take a chance and involve him in her games?  The author gives us handy hints: “… if you ever see someone who looks a little bit ‘on-their-own’, try to include them.  Ask them what they like to do.  You never know, it might be something that YOU love to do as well, and you might just have met your new best friend!”

A kind and useful book.  If you like this, I also recommend Ruby’s Worry, an excellent book by the same author about getting help when the worry monster visits.

Review by Bethan

July 14, 2020

Braiding Sweetgrass – Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Penguin, £9.99, out now Robin Wall Kimmerer BRAIDING SWEETGRASS.jpg

“Even a wounded world is feeding us.  Even a wounded world holds us, giving us moments of wonder and joy.  I choose joy over despair.  Not because I have my head in the sand, but because joy is what the earth gives me daily and I must return the gift” (p. 327).  I came across Robin Wall Kimmerer, botanist and popular science and nature writer, through references to her earlier work Gathering Moss.  She is the Distinguished Teaching Professor of Environmental Biology at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse, New York.  Gathering Moss has been mentioned in literary reviews, in nature writing, in science writing, and on the thoughtful blog Brain Pickings (https://www.brainpickings.org/2015/05/13/gathering-moss-robin-wall-kimmerer/).  Anything so niche, which appeals across such broad spectrum of readers, intrigued me.

I still haven’t managed to read Gathering Moss, mainly as it’s hard to find in the UK, but I am completely bowled over by her latest work, Braiding Sweetgrass.  Wall Kimmerer shares her vast knowledge and wisdom about plants and the natural world and introduces a completely new (and yet also ancient) way of thinking about nature.  She draws on her many roles: as a Native American, a mother, an observer, a scientist and a joyful activist.

She provides a refreshing and vital alternative approach to thinking about human and non-human life.  Language is key here: for her, and the indigenous cultures she describes, every living thing is a who, not a what.

Her writing about specific engagements with nature is as engrossing as her big picture analysis, and often the two meet. As she and other volunteers gather to help salamanders across a busy road, so they will not be killed by passing cars, the second Gulf War begins.  “Somewhere another woman looks out her window, but the formation of dark shapes in her sky is not a skein of spring geese returning” (p.349).

There is nothing fluffy or foolish about her coherent and radical ecology.  “… it seems to me we humans have gifts in addition to gratitude that we might offer in return.  The philosophy of reciprocity is beautiful in the abstract, but the practical is harder” (p. 238).  She is ready to engage with the practical questions of how we live now, as a planet, as a species, as nations and as individuals.

Review by Bethan

July 11, 2020

We are so happy to be open!

by Team Riverside

We’re very excited to be back! Come and see us in London Bridge. bookshop on 13 July 2020.jpg

We’re also happy to order books so give us a call or email.

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July 3, 2020

Reopening Tuesday 7th July

by Team Riverside

Dear Customers,

We’ve missed you!

We plan to reopen on Tuesday 7th July.

Opening hours will differ from our regular hours as we will be working with a much smaller team but we still hope to be open seven days a week.

Initially we will open:

10am to 4.30pm on weekdays

11am to 5pm on Saturdays

11am to 4pm on Sundays

We will be closed Sunday 12 July.

It may take us a while before we have all the new books you might need but we will be offering our usual ordering service and will be happy to take orders via phone or email once we are up and running.

best wishes

The Riverside Bookshop