Archive for September, 2021

September 24, 2021

Bestsellers 17th-24th September

by Team Riverside

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You

Suzannah Clarke – Piranesi

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Frank Herbert – Dune

John Cooper Clarke – I Wanna Be Yours

Monique Roffey – The Mermaid of Black Conch

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Nadifa Mohamed – The Fortune Men

Sally Rooney – Normal People

Eoin McLaughlin – The Hug

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

September 19, 2021

How Was That Built?

by Team Riverside
How Was That Built window

We were so delighted to welcome the author and illustrator to install a lovely window display for the new children’s book How Was That Built? by Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey.

We have signed copies and we are so delighted with our window!

September 18, 2021

Mindful Mr Sloth by Katy Hudson

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Raintree and Curious Frog, £6.99, out now

Mindful Mr Sloth

Sasha has an enviable treehouse and a bunch of activities that she’s ready to do at high speed.  She even has lists of books she’s read – including a personal best reading time of 20 seconds!  This is all excellent fun, but when a sloth bonks down on the treehouse roof, she learns that slow can be fun too.

This very appealing children’s picture book shows a lovely day being had while also providing a useful way in to mindfulness (or just to slowing down and paying good attention).  The illustrations themselves provide a great reward for attending: vibrant and cheerful, and little details that repay seeing rather than just looking.

There is a helpful focus on the natural world (and not just sloths), showing that mindfulness and its rewards are possible everywhere.  Offering quiet and stillness as positive ways to enjoy the smell of flowers or the sound of birdsong, rather than just as corrections to what adults consider ‘too much’ noise or activity, is also welcome.

Who would not want to learn mindfulness from a sloth?

Review by Bethan

September 12, 2021

Ethel Rosenberg by Anne Sebba

by Team Riverside
Ethel Rosenberg cover

Hardback, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, £20.00, out now

Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were executed in the United States for treason in 1953.  A married couple, and the parents of two young children, their case became a cause célèbre as a miscarriage of justice, a cultural reference point, and a symbol of US domestic attitudes during the Cold War.  Amid all of this, the human story of Ethel Rosenberg has been lost, and this is what Anne Sebba’s engrossing biography corrects.

With access to new information from Ethel’s sons and others who knew her, as well as scrupulous archive research, Sebba meticulously reconstructs the life of this ordinary and extraordinary woman.  We find out about her upbringing in a New York Jewish family facing hard times.  We are left with the impression of an intelligent, talented and hardworking woman from a difficult family background, who was determined to make her way in life – in education, in singing, as a trade unionist, and as a wife and mother.

The book offers a vivid account of how some Americans came to communism in the 1930s, and how ordinary people started spying for the Soviet Union.  Sebba unpicks what Ethel Rosenberg did and didn’t know about the leaking of atomic secrets to the Soviet Union, and gives a detailed analysis of her trial.  She conveys the swirl of McCarthyism and anti-communist fever, and the impact of ingrained anti-Semitism.

Sebba spares us nothing, so it can be a tough read at times, but it is so worthwhile.  It is no wonder that the biography has been praised by Claire Tomalin, Simon Sebag Montefiore and Philippe Sands, among others.  Among the moments of light in the frequently grim story that Ethel’s two young children live through, are the moments of solidarity and care shown to them from unexpected quarters (including at one point W. E. B. Du Bois).  Outstanding.

Review by Bethan

September 9, 2021

Bestsellers 2nd to the 9th of September

by Team Riverside

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Pat Barker – The Women of Troy

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Emily St. John Mandel – The Glass Hotel

Caitlin Moran – More Than a Woman

Fran Lebowitz – The Fran Lebowitz Reader

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Clare Chambers – Small Pleasures

Charlie Macksey – The Boy, The Mole, The Fox and The Horse

Merlin Sheldrake – Entangled Life

Sebastian Faulks – Snow Country

Elena Ferrante – The Lying Life of Adults

September 7, 2021

Signed copies of new Sally Rooney…

by Team Riverside
Sally Rooney book signed picture

… are going fast!

Come down to nab yours today.

September 7, 2021

Small Bodies of Water by Nina Mingya Powles

by Team Riverside
Small Bodies of Water book cover

Hardback, Canongate, £14.99, out now

I have just had my first swim in a year and a half.  It was a completely joyous experience, and I was reminded how important swimming is for me.  Many memories of places and people are bound up with it.

Nina Mingya Powles’s essays, collected in Small Bodies of Water, were the perfect thing for me to read just after this memorable swim.  She combines memoir with nature writing, weaving strands about family, identity and home through the work.  Swimming features, as do sensory delights of food and travel.  Her essay on cold water swimming, Ache, was one of my favourites.  She is a generous writer, sharing experiences with us, even painful things like personal and shocking experiences of racism. 

Born in Aotearoa New Zealand, spending time in China and now living in London, the author’s experiences and interests coalesce in her writing: “Mum collects mandarin peels and cut lemon skins and places them in the dish after cooking, so that as the oven cools, it gives off a bittersweet, hot-sugar scent.  The rinds begin to dry out and curl in the warmth while the dog sleeps at our feet.  Not far away, we can hear waves roaring in a southerly gale.  Our skin smells of salt and oranges.” (p. 124)

A poet who won the Nan Shepherd prize for nature writing, Nina Mingya Powles writes as beautifully as you’d expect, and wears her thoughtfulness and reading lightly.  References to some of Riverside’s favourite books kept popping up.  Braiding Sweetgrass, Crying in H Mart, Mixed Race Superman, Wayward Lives and The Living Mountain all feature, and gave me the pleasurable feeling of having a very intelligent friend talking about things I had just read.  Her discussion of old family objects and writings as a sort of enduring but complicated archive usefully echoes Maria Stepanova’s In Memory of Memory. 

I know I will read this again, and I have already lined up two people to lend it to.  It feels like a gift someone has given you, and that you want to share with others.

Review by Bethan

September 6, 2021

Bestsellers 30 August to 5 September

by Team Riverside

Pat Barker – The Women of Troy

The Women of Troy book cover

Bernardine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Stephen Fry – Troy

Charlie Mackesy – The Boy, the Mole, the Fox and the Horse

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Bella Mackie – How to Kill Your Family

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie – Notes on Grief

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and the Sun

James Mayhew – Katie in London

Mary South – You Will Never Be Forgotten

Caitlyn Moran – More Than a Woman

Sayaka Morata – Earthlings

Merlin Sheldrake – Entangled Life

Matt Haig – The Midnight Library

Elena Ferrante – The Lying Life of Adults

Janice Hallett – The Appeal

Olivia Petter – Millennial Love

Elif Shafak – The Island of Missing Trees

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

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September 2, 2021

Bestsellers 24 to 30 August

by Team Riverside

Pat Barker – The Women of Troy

Women of Troy cover

Elif Shafak – The Island of Missing Trees

John Kampfner – Why the Germans Do It Better

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Pat Barker – The Silence of the Girls

Bernardine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Simon Lelic – The Search Party

Fran Lebowitz – The Fran Lebowitz Reader

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Delia Owens – Where the Crawdads Sing

Clare Chambers – Small Pleasures

Michelle Zauner – Crying in H Mart

Ottessa Moshfegh – Death in her Hands

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Pen Vogler – Scoff

Bessel Van Der Kolk – The Body Keeps the Score

Judith Kerr – The Tiger Who Came to Tea

Philippa Perry – The Book You Wish Your Parents Had Read

Dolly Alderton – Ghosts

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