Archive for October, 2021

October 30, 2021

Bestsellers 23rd – 30th October

by Team Riverside

Frank Herbert – Dune

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Various Authors – A Scandinavian Christmas: Festive Tales For a Nordic Noel

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

John Preston – Fall: The Mystery of Robert Maxwell

Jonathon Franzen – Crossroads

Lea Ypi – Free: Coming of Age at the End of History

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Sosuke Natsukawa – The Cat Who Saved Books

Rachel Morrisroe, Steven Lenton – How To Grow a Unicorn

Stephanie Garnier – How to Live Like Your Cat

Ralph Ellison – Invisible Man

John Steinbeck – The Vigilante

Shon Faye – The Transgender Issue

October 29, 2021

There’s a Ghost in this House by Oliver Jeffers

by Team Riverside
There's a Ghost in this House

Hardback, HarperCollins, £20, out now

This is a delightful, mildly spooky picture book from the author of Lost and Found. 

There are supposed to be ghosts in our host’s large old house, but she has never seen them – can you?  With the help of tracing paper inserts and atmospheric photos, we can not only find the ghosts but also see the hijinks that they get up to.

It is a brilliant idea, and a timeless book.  It goes for funny rather than scary, and the ghosts are quite endearing.  You find yourself thinking that living in a haunted house might be quite jolly.

We have signed copies in store.  Happy Halloween!

Review by Bethan

October 23, 2021

Bestsellers 16th-23rd October

by Team Riverside

John le Carre – Silverview

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Stanley Tucci – Taste: My Life Through Food

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Elizabeth Strout – Oh William!

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Elena Ferrante – The Lying Life of Adults

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Suzanna Clarke – Piranesi

Rumaan Alam – Leave The World Behind

Yotam Ottolenghi, Noor Murad – Ottolenghi Test Kitchen: Shelf Love

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Florence Given – Women Don’t Owe You Pretty

Shirley Jackson – The Haunting of Hill House

October 18, 2021

Taste: My Life Through Food by Stanley Tucci

by Team Riverside
Stanley Tucci Taste

Hardback, Penguin Fig Tree, £20, out now

You must be careful when reading this book.  You might end up with a shopping list that suddenly includes good vodka, Valtellina cheese, and bushels of fresh tomatoes.  I read it on a Sunday afternoon, snacking enjoyably throughout, and had a deeply relaxing time.

Tucci is just as funny, smart and interesting in Taste as he is on his excellent TV show Searching for Italy (https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/stanley-tucci-searching-for-italy-restaurants/index.html).  He gives an enjoyable account of moments in his life through food, including hilarious dialogue with his family, right the way through to a surprisingly relatable account of being stuck indoors in London with his kids during the first lockdown.  Aged about six, watching a food show on television, his mother tells him that the presenter is cooking a duck.  He says “A duck?!!!… From a pond?”  His mother says “I guess so.  I don’t know”.

Dotted throughout are hungry-making recipes.  Achievable cocktails accompany grand epics like the timpano (as seen in the movie Big Night), which turns out to have been a source of both joy and stress in the Tucci household over a run of Christmases.  Jay Rayner has a smashing time cooking it with Stanley Tucci though (see https://www.theguardian.com/food/2021/oct/17/the-day-i-cooked-timpano-with-stanley-tucci-jay-rayner).

Fans of Big Night and Julie and Julia will find cheerful behind the scenes gossip here.  Tucci namedrops with abandon, which is the only possible way to do it with style.  Ryan Reynolds, Meryl Streep, Colin Firth, Marcello Mastroianni and endless friends from the world of food pop up.  Taste is both thoughtful and sweary, one of my favourite combinations.

I agree that battered family cookware can be heirlooms, as Tucci notes.  There are often things that we associate strongly with the important cooks in our lives.  A friend’s mum always made toffee in the same tin: it had hammer marks where years of toffee bashing had occurred.  These things are precious.

Tucci’s account of his cancer, which leads him to have terrible trouble with food and eating during his treatment and recovery, is moving and important.  That food for him is about connecting with others is clear throughout the book, and his deprivation of this key aspect of life during his illness hurts.  His joy at surviving and being able to get back to eating with the people he loves leaps off the page.

I suspect that many people will buy this lovely thing for other people this Christmas.  Do this by all means, but read it sneakily yourself first.  It’s like being on a sunny food holiday with a generous and entertaining friend.  We have signed copies!

Review by Bethan

October 18, 2021

Signed copies in store!

by Team Riverside
Stanley Tucci Taste

Bernardine Evaristo – Manifesto

Elizabeth Strout – Oh William!

Amor Towles – Lincoln Highway

Karina Lickorish Quinn – The Dust Never Settles

Yotam Ottolenghi and Noor Murad – Ottolenghi Test Kitchen Shelf Love

Stanley Tucci – Taste

Maggie Shipstead – Great Circle

Oliver Jeffers – There’s a Ghost in this House

Matt Haig – A Mouse Called Miika

Richard Powers – Bewilderment

Colm Tóibín – The Magician

Roddy Doyle – Life Without Children

Ruth Ozeki – The Book of Form and Emptiness

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Sarah Hall – Burntcoat

Leïla Slimani – The Country of Others

Catherine Madden and Anthony Elliott – Folds

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

October 15, 2021

Bestsellers 9th – 15th October

by Team Riverside

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Yotam Ottolenghi, Noor Murad – Ottolenghi Test Kitchen: Shelf Love

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Bob Mortimer – And Away…

Marion Billet – Busy London

Sosuke Natsukawa – The Cat Who Saved Books

Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche – Notes on Greif

Suzanna Clarke – Piranesi

Frank Herbert – Dune

Florence Given – Women Don’t Owe You Pretty

Judith Kerr – Mog the Forgetful Cat

Jeremy Paxman – Black Gold

Jonathon Franzen – Crossroads

October 13, 2021

Wake: The Hidden History of Women-Led Slave Revolts by Rebecca Hall

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Particular Books, £20, out now

Rebecca Hall Wake

This new graphic novel and memoir charts historian Rebecca Hall’s search for women rebel slave leaders in archives in the UK and US.  It is gripping, moving, and compelling.

Formerly a social justice lawyer, Hall’s work starts in New York in 1999, and Hugo Martínez’s illustrations show the slaving past literally reflected in the city as Hall walks through it.  It’s a brilliant way of showing how the past is inescapable in the present.  The graphic novel format lends itself to this so well, literally illustrating the similarities in some behaviour and surroundings between then and now. A smartly dressed white man barges into Hall without seeing her, and in a window reflection a white man in a tricorn hat pushes past another Black woman.

There are newly found stories of women-led revolts here, showing that her exhaustive work has paid off, and they are told with deep humanity.

As with Saidiya Hartman’s work on transforming and disrupting the archive, Hall does the work of interrogating why archives are as they are (anyone who loved Wayward Lives and Lose Your Mother will find this essential reading – see https://riversidebookshop.co.uk/2020/09/23/wayward-lives-beautiful-experiments-by-saidiya-hartman/).  The realisation that current racism and sexism have some of their roots in slavery is manifest. The historian as human is very present – “This work I’m doing is hard, and it hurts.”

Wake gives a vivid account of the difficulty of finding people in official archives when their voices are not recorded, being considered of no importance, or when their only seeming presence is as property.  She is also explicit about the UK archives which barred her from access, and those which felt they held nothing about slavery.

Hall describes herself as being haunted by slavery.  This really is a haunting book, necessarily violent and painful, showing that hard and committed work by historians can be revolutionary. 

Review by Bethan

October 12, 2021

Index, A History of the by Dennis Duncan

by Team Riverside
Index, A History of the

Hardback, Allen Lane, £20, out now

I did not expect to laugh out loud while reading a proper scholarly history of the index.  But I did, several times. And I now know that the little pointing hand in the margin is a manicule: ☞ (see also https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/manicules).

I did not realise that an index might be more than a handy tool.  In the course of Duncan’s account, we find out than an index can be so many other things.  For example, a means of revenge, a strange addition to fiction, or a way to satirise an author.  We get information on the first things organised by alphabet, the first page numbers, and all kinds of natty anecdotes.  One of my favourite bits is 19th century historian J. Horace Round’s extensive diss-fest index entry on his nemesis Professor Edward Freeman, which includes “his ‘certain’ history”, “misconstrues his Latin”, “his failure” and “his special weakness” (p. 14-15).

I am a fan of a good index.  They can drive you nuts if they are absent or shoddy.  Why would anyone make a travel book without at least a location index?  Am I supposed to memorise the location of every café that makes the best bath buns or Black Forest gateaux?  One of the most enjoyable I’ve seen recently is the one for Rob Halford’s Confess, in which the Judas Priest frontman’s life is summarised under the entry for Halford, Rob.  But this leads to another topic covered in the History, namely the suggestion that students might cheat (gasp) by reading only the index instead of the actual book. Another favourite is in Donald Knuth’s The Art of Computer Programming (volume 3 from 1973). He references “royalties, use of”, and this refers to the purchase of his dream pipe organ (see https://www-cs-faculty.stanford.edu/~knuth/organ.html).

Index, A History of the has been added to my list of relaxing and entertaining non-fiction that I have found helpful during the pandemic.  During the first lockdown, I realised that the most engaging reading I was doing was well written non-fiction on topics about which I knew nothing (lots of scope here, obviously).  Top hits for me were Born to Kvetch, Gathering Moss, and Entangled Life.

Make time to work your way through this book’s own index.  It is enormous fun and had me cackling.  This is what I’ll be getting for my bookish people for Christmas this year.

Review by Bethan

October 9, 2021

Bestsellers 2nd – 9th October

by Team Riverside

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Karina Lickorish Quinn – The Dust Never Settles

Sosuke Natsukawa – The Cat Who Saved Books

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Shon Faye – The Transgender Issue

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Merlin Sheldrake – Entangled Life

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Pat Barker – The Women of Troy

Stanley Tucci – Taste: My Life Through Food

William Boyd – Trio

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Bob Mortimer – And Away…

October 6, 2021

Filthy Animals by Brandon Taylor

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Daunt Books, £9.99, out now

Filthy Animals is the new collection of short stories from Booker Prize shortlisted writer Brandon Taylor, fans of his characteristically vivid prose and razor-sharp observations will not be disappointed by this stunning collection.

Taylor has a gift for portraying social discomfort in excruciating detail and this is perhaps best on display in the first story in the collection ‘Potluck’. Lionel, a character recovering from a suicide attempt becomes caught up in the world of Charles and Sophie, both dancers involved in an open relationship. Their encounters are ambiguous but powerful, affectionate but also distant and strange. In stories such as ‘Mass’ there is often an emphasis on the characters physicality, many of them are training to be professional dancers and there is an acute, Degas-like focus on their muscular bodies as a site for potential greatness and also a possible site of disaster. There is a kind of slipperiness throughout the book, many of the interactions between characters turn rapidly from friendly to hostile and back again. But love is always present, after so much anxiety and fraught relationships, the tenderness of ‘Anne of Cleves’ caught me off guard, it’s a beautifully realised story about a relationship blossoming between two women.

The stunning, cinematic quality of Taylor’s prose never fails, each story has a complete world within it, even when the characters fail to communicate verbally, the atmosphere is palpable. I recommend this book especially for fans of Lucia Berlin.

Review by Phoebe

October 2, 2021

Bestsellers 25th September to 2nd October

by Team Riverside

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Shon Faye – The Transgender Issue

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Tom Chivers – London Clay

Maggie O’Farrell – Hamnet

Suzannah Clarke – Piranesi

Frank Herbert – Dune

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche – Notes on Grief

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Colson Whitehead – Harlem Shuffle

Bob Mortimer – And Away…

Marion Billet – Busy London