Archive for May, 2022

May 29, 2022

Bestsellers 23rd – 30th May

by Team Riverside
Meg Mason - Sorrow and Bliss

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Sally Rooney – Normal People

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Douglas Stuart – Young Mungo

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Natasha Brown – Assembly

Akwaeke Emezi – You made a Fool of Death with your Beauty

May 28, 2022

Jubilee Bank Holiday Opening Times

by Team Riverside

Thursday 2nd June 11.00 – 17.00

Friday 3rd June 11.00 – 17.00

Saturday 4th June 10.00 – 18.00

Sunday 5th June 11.00 – 17.00

We look forward to seeing you!

May 26, 2022

Groundskeeping by Lee Cole

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Faber and Faber, £16.99, out now

Groundskeeping is a beautifully written debut novel that contends with questions of class, family and love. Cole’s protagonist Owen is working as a groundskeeper at a university when he meets Alma, a writer who has taken up a prestigious fellowship. Over the course of their relationship Owen is forced to better understand his relationship to his family, his home state and what role he will play in his changing life.

The novel is set in 2016, and Cole handles the political differences between the characters thoughtfully. Owen vehemently disagrees with his mother and stepfather, both Trump supporters, but they show a great deal of kindness to Owen and Alma. Their political views sit in stark contrast with the hospitality they show to Alma, who is Muslim. Cole renders rural Kentucky complexly; this is a contemporary novel that handles the subject of class with such intelligence and care. The rift that develops in Owen and Alma’s relationship is founded in her classism, even though she is a second-generation immigrant she has a comparatively privileged background, she went to an Ivy League college, she mocks Owen when he is accepted to a lesser-known writing fellowship.

The prose is dazzling, the world of the novel is created through gorgeous sensory detail, this is one of the best written debut novels I have read this year.

May 24, 2022

Welsh Plural: Essays on the Future of Wales – editors Darren Chetty, Grug Muse, Hanan Issa, Iestyn Tyne

by Team Riverside
cover of Welsh Plural

Paperback, Repeater Books, £12.99, out now

The editors of Welsh Plural have gathered some of the most interesting and relevant writers from Wales to consider what Welsh identity means today.  This is anything but niche: for anyone thinking about what identity, belonging and borders mean or could come to mean, this is helpful.  It is no surprise that this anthology has won praise from Nikesh Shukla and Gary Younge.

The book’s cover illustrates a willingness to engage in critical thinking that characterises this collection.  It shows a beautiful section of the Wrexham Quilt, made by a military tailor in the mid-nineteenth century.  “Like this book, it conveys a patchwork of experiences, from religious scenes to tributes to the industrial heritage of Wales.  Other motifs show giraffes, elephants and palm trees – souvenirs of Wales’ part in the conquests of the British Empire, made possible by armies clothed by tailors such as James Williams”.

The range of topics covered and approaches make this a compelling read.  There is a Choose Your Own Adventure style guide to being a Welsh novelist by Gary Raymond.  Charlotte Williams, who is examining outcomes for children of colour in Welsh education for the Welsh Government, discusses this alongside her own experience of being the only child of colour in her Welsh classroom in the 1960s.  Darren Chetty explores Welsh pubs called The Black Boy, both their history and how they handle their name now.  And there is much more.

I felt I had been given a gift of original and challenging thoughts.  Some themes came out strongly for me, particularly the intersection of racialised people and Welshness.  Several writers give valuable and vital accounts related this.  There are also conflicts and disagreements between the pieces, which suggests that the editors intended to allow space for complexity, nuance and difference.  I found this approach invigorating, and helpful.  I was grateful that the book was in English, allowing me as a non-Welsh speaker access.  Diolch yn fawr iawn, pawb.

Reading this on holiday in Wales at the time of the local elections felt important.  I am most envious of anyone who got to attend the related event in Machynlleth (which I heard about from colleagues at the smashing Pen’rallt Gallery Bookshop – it sounded like an excellent evening).  Reading Welsh Plural also brought the small publisher Repeater Books to my attention, whose range looks well worth digging into.

By coincidence, I followed this up by reading Nick Hayes’ The Book of Trespass (paperback, Bloomsbury, £9.99).  Hayes’ investigation into what the idea and law of trespass means in the UK now also engages with the issues of land, walls and identities.  As in Welsh Plural, there are moments of joy and celebration among the sometimes difficult content.  Hayes and his dog see a row of deer appear by magic as they walk through a wood: “This kind of moment is only available off the path.  It is prosaic, but it feels like a miracle, it feels meaningful, and it leaves me with my heart thumping in my throat…  I would swap a hundred nice walks along a pretty Right of Way for this one moment of magic”.

Review by Bethan

May 22, 2022

Bestsellers 15th – 22nd of May

by Team Riverside

Elizabeth Strout – Oh William!

Elizabeth Day – Magpie

Elif Shafak – The Island of The Missing Trees

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Marion Billet – Busy London

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Natasha Brown – Assembly

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Maggie O’Farrell – Hamnet

Mieko Kawakami – All The Lovers In The Night

Douglas Stuart – Young Mungo

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Flann O’Brien – The Third Policeman

May 13, 2022

Bestsellers 6th – 13th May

by Team Riverside

Elizabeth Strout – Oh William!

John Le Carre – Silverview

Elif Shafak – The Island of The Missing Trees

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Cecily Gayford – Murder by The Seaside

Elizabeth Day – Magpie

Sally Rooney – Conversations With Friends

Daisy Buchanan – Insatiable

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Marion Billet – Busy London

bell hooks – All About Love

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Chris Power – A Lonely Man

May 8, 2022

Bestsellers 1st – 8th May

by Team Riverside

Elizabeth Strout – Oh William!

John Le Carre – Silverview

Emily St. John Mandel – Sea of Tranquility

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

bell hooks – All About Love

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Oliver Burkeman – Four Thousand Weeks

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

M.H. Eccleston – The Trust

Min Jin Lee – Pachinko

Clara Vulliamy – Marshmallow Pie: The Cat Superstar

Oliver Jeffers – Here We Are

Elizabeth Day – Magpie

May 3, 2022

Chris Naylor-Ballesteros – Frank and Bert

by Team Riverside
cover of Frank and Bert

Paperback, Nosy Crow, £6.99, out now

What should you do if your best friend always wants to play hide and seek but never wins?  Frank the fox faces just this dilemma with his bear friend Bert.

In this simple and funny picture book for young children, we explore ideas about what makes a good friend.  Frank gives Bert an extra-long count so that he can hide really well… but Bert’s unravelling scarf gives him away.  Should Frank stick strictly to the rules of the game, and tell Bert he’s been found, or should he let Bert have a moment of glory?

This is a cheerful story but is also a useful introduction to the complexities of friendships.  For little children who are starting out on friendships, it might be useful to know that the kind thing to do isn’t always the same as the rule-based thing to do.  Reading this made me realise how much social interaction of this type is not obvious at all, but has to be learnt.

I approve strongly of another of Frank’s expressions of friendship, which is re-knitting Bert’s unravelled scarf so that the friends can play hide and seek together again (it looks like a chevron stitch pattern to me).  Friendship, kindness and knitting – what’s not to love?

Review by Bethan

May 1, 2022

Bestsellers 24th April – 1st May

by Team Riverside

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Daisy Buchanan – Insatiable

Marion Billet – Busy London

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Alice Oseman – Heartstopper Volume 2

Douglas Stuart – Young Mungo

Joseph Hone – The Paper Chase

Nicholas Nassim Taleb – Antifragile

Shirley Jackson – The Missing Girl

Catherine Belton – Putin’s People

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Emily Danforth – Plain Bad Heroines