Posts tagged ‘Civil Rights’

January 5, 2020

The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Fleet, £16.99, out nowColson Whitehead THE NICKEL BOYS

This is a completely gripping novel based on the horrific true-life events at the Arthur G Dozier School for Boys, in Florida.  Elwood has just started to be involved in the civil rights protests sweeping the US in the 1960s, but can he use what he has learnt to survive in the notorious Nickel Academy?

Elwood is inspired to join the civil rights movement after listening to a Martin Luther King record bought by his grandmother.  He tries to stick to everyone’s rules, but events overtake him and he ends up in a reform school.  Torture and death are rumoured for some of the boys at Nickel Academy.  How can you survive, or keep your soul alive, where there appears to be no rescue on the horizon?  Can you do both of these things at the same time?

I read this short novel in a single sitting, knowing that I would not be able to think properly about anything else until I had finished it.  The characters felt so real, I had to know what happened to them.  Knowing that it was based on real events, I was concerned that the novel should do justice to the horrors uncovered (see https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/apr/22/a-type-of-justice-florida-reform-school-yields-evidence-of-more-graves, and https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/jul/20/colson-whitehead-reality-is-kids-shot-by-racist-cops for Whitehead’s own views on his novel).  It absolutely does.

The Nickel Boys speaks to current debates around historical abuse, institutional racism, and how we deal with the shadows of the long past.  It engages with questions of whose voices are listened to and whose are not: why did it take so long for the authorities to listen to survivors?

Review by Bethan

October 10, 2018

Whatever Happened to Interracial Love by Kathleen Collins

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Granta, £8.99, out nowKathleen Collins WHATEVER HAPPENED TO INTERRACIAL LOVE

Not published until 2016, decades after Collins’ death, these short stories are dazzling rediscoveries. Set during the civil rights era, they explore this radical time with equal parts joy and heartbreak. I love the way her writing describes fully realised characters and the emotional connection between them. In ‘The Happy Family’ the narrator describes a younger man from the titular family, “Andrew had such an incredible presence that even I was often intimidated by him. He was one of those people whom you almost do not assign an age. He had the ability to focus himself on a moment, bring all his presence to bear and so charge the air that you were a bit shaken.”(p.78) When this man falls in love with a family friend, the description of it is beautiful, “I would give anything to see them again, loose limbed and free, coming into the apartment and heating it with a glow, an intensity so strong it made you tingle…” p.78-9)

I agree with Zadie Smith about this collection, she said “To be this good and yet to be ignored is shameful, but her rediscovery is a great piece of luck, for us.” (http://kathleencollins.org/advance-reviews-for-interracial-love/)

 

Review by Cat