May 13, 2022

Bestsellers 6th – 13th May

by Team Riverside

Elizabeth Strout – Oh William!

John Le Carre – Silverview

Elif Shafak – The Island of The Missing Trees

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Cecily Gayford – Murder by The Seaside

Elizabeth Day – Magpie

Sally Rooney – Conversations With Friends

Daisy Buchanan – Insatiable

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Marion Billet – Busy London

bell hooks – All About Love

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Chris Power – A Lonely Man

May 8, 2022

Bestsellers 1st – 8th May

by Team Riverside

Elizabeth Strout – Oh William!

John Le Carre – Silverview

Emily St. John Mandel – Sea of Tranquility

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

bell hooks – All About Love

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Oliver Burkeman – Four Thousand Weeks

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

M.H. Eccleston – The Trust

Min Jin Lee – Pachinko

Clara Vulliamy – Marshmallow Pie: The Cat Superstar

Oliver Jeffers – Here We Are

Elizabeth Day – Magpie

May 3, 2022

Chris Naylor-Ballesteros – Frank and Bert

by Team Riverside
cover of Frank and Bert

Paperback, Nosy Crow, £6.99, out now

What should you do if your best friend always wants to play hide and seek but never wins?  Frank the fox faces just this dilemma with his bear friend Bert.

In this simple and funny picture book for young children, we explore ideas about what makes a good friend.  Frank gives Bert an extra-long count so that he can hide really well… but Bert’s unravelling scarf gives him away.  Should Frank stick strictly to the rules of the game, and tell Bert he’s been found, or should he let Bert have a moment of glory?

This is a cheerful story but is also a useful introduction to the complexities of friendships.  For little children who are starting out on friendships, it might be useful to know that the kind thing to do isn’t always the same as the rule-based thing to do.  Reading this made me realise how much social interaction of this type is not obvious at all, but has to be learnt.

I approve strongly of another of Frank’s expressions of friendship, which is re-knitting Bert’s unravelled scarf so that the friends can play hide and seek together again (it looks like a chevron stitch pattern to me).  Friendship, kindness and knitting – what’s not to love?

Review by Bethan

May 1, 2022

Bestsellers 24th April – 1st May

by Team Riverside

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Daisy Buchanan – Insatiable

Marion Billet – Busy London

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Alice Oseman – Heartstopper Volume 2

Douglas Stuart – Young Mungo

Joseph Hone – The Paper Chase

Nicholas Nassim Taleb – Antifragile

Shirley Jackson – The Missing Girl

Catherine Belton – Putin’s People

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Emily Danforth – Plain Bad Heroines

April 30, 2022

Sam Sedgman and Sam Brewster – Epic Adventures

by Team Riverside
Book cover of Epic Adventures

Hardback, Macmillan, £12.99, out now

Epic Adventures is a pleasingly large non-fiction picture book for children about great train journeys.  From the Shinkansen bullet train in Japan to the Trans-Siberian express, this colourfully illustrated book inspires the wish to jump on a train and head off on an adventure.  As we are just opposite London Bridge station, this urge is particularly strong just now!

You can tell this was written by a real train fan, as it has excellent facts and is suffused with enthusiasm.  Sedgman is also author of train-based adventure stories for children including The Highland Falcon Thief, and the accessible prose in Epic Adventures shows that he is used to writing for children.  He addresses the colonial heritage of some of the railways concerned, and the displacement they caused, which is important.  I also appreciated the emphasis on rail as a more environmentally friendly form of travel.

My favourite of the many colourful illustrations is the northern lights overhead as the Arctic Sleeper speeds through to Norway.

As a fan of armchair rail travel (see The World’s Most Scenic Rail Journeys and Mighty Trains, on television) this inspires me to do some actual rail travel as soon as possible.  Good for perhaps age 7 and up, Epic Adventures has history and geography, festivals and food.  A nicely exciting gift for a young would-be traveller.

Review by Bethan

April 26, 2022

New Signed Copies

by Team Riverside
Cover of book None of This is Serious

So excited to have all these new signed copies in the shop…

Jessie Greengrass – The High House

Jeremy Atherton Lin – Gay Bar

Emily St. John Mandel – Sea of Tranquility

Maddie Mortimer – Maps of Our Spectacular Bodies

Catherine Prasifka – None of This is Serious

Laura Price – Single Bald Female

Ali Smith – Companion Piece

Nina Stibbe – One Day I Shall Astonish the World

Douglas Stuart – Young Mungo

Charmaine Wilkerson – Black Cake

April 25, 2022

Bank holiday opening hours

by Team Riverside

This bank holiday, Monday 2 May, we will be open 11am to 5pm.

April 25, 2022

Sea of Tranquility by Emily St. John Mandel

by Team Riverside
cover of Sea of Tranquility

Hardback, Picador, £14.99, out now

Three people, separately and at different points over three hundred years, experience an anomaly.  In the middle of their ordinary lives, there is an instant of blackness, a violin, a strange sound.  Then everything reverts to normal.  One of these is an exile from England in Canada in 1812; one a novelist visiting Earth on a book tour; one is Vincent, a young woman walking through a wilderness.  Also linking them is the detective Gaspery-Jacques Roberts from the 25th century, who is investigating this glitch in time and space.

Sea of Tranquility follows St. John Mandel’s outstanding novel The Glass Hotel (see https://riversidebookshop.co.uk/2020/08/05/the-glass-hotel-by-emily-st-john-mandel/).  Several characters, including Vincent and Mirella, appear here.  I shouted out loud, I was so delighted to see Vincent again.  The humanity and relatability of the characters is clear, so much so that their extraordinary circumstances came to seem normal to me as I read.  Off world colonies and multiple worlds are made familiar to us by the concerns of those living in them: fear in the face of danger, suspicion of overarching authorities, affection for home, and the pull of those you love.  Olive, visiting Earth and more specifically Salt Lake City, says: “There’s something to be said for looking up at a clear blue sky and knowing that it isn’t a dome”.

Like Octavia E. Butler, whose novels I am belatedly discovering, St. John Mandel uses her futuristic work to explore ideas about ethics and responsibility.  If you knew what was going to happen to everyone you met, would you be able to resist intervening in their lives?  Who gets to decide what is the ‘right’ world, the ‘correct’ timeline, and why?

The novelist Olive Llewellyn speaks of pandemics to her book tour audiences, and the Covid-19 pandemic features as a historical incident.  But as a new virus pops up on the news during the tour, her reactions to it feel very familiar to us.  As do her feelings, in 2203, being asked about being away from her young daughter for work.  A woman praises Olive’s husband for looking after her daughter.  “Forgive me,” Olive said, “I fear there’s a problem with my translator bot.  I thought you said he was kind to care for his own child”.

I enjoyed this novel so much.  There is also a good cat in this book.

Review by Bethan

April 24, 2022

Bestsellers 17th – 24th April

by Team Riverside

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Eliot Higgins – We Are Bellingcat

Jeremy Atherton Lin – Gay Bar

Tim Marshall – Prisoners of Geography

Julian Barnes – Elizabeth Finch

Ray Bradbury – Fahrenheit 451

Catherine Belton – Putin’s People

Sarah Winman – Still Life

Bella Mackie – How to Kill Your Family

Emily Danforth – Plain Bad Heroines

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Luke Kennard – The Answer to Everything

Albert Camus – The Plague

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

April 19, 2022

Jeremy Atherton Lin signed copies

by Team Riverside
photo of Jeremy Atherton Lin with his book Gay Bar

Thank you to Jeremy Atherton Lin for visiting to sign copies of Gay Bar! Nab one before they go.

April 18, 2022

Bestsellers 11th April – 18th April

by Team Riverside

Elif Shafak – The Island of The Missing Trees

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Stanley Tucci – Taste

Ali Smith – Companion Piece

Douglas Stuart – Young Mungo

Bella Mackie – How To Kill Your Family

Patrick Radden Keefe – Empire of Pain

Michael Lewis – The Premonition

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Frank Tallis – The Act of Living

Adam Hargreaves – Mr. Men in London

Eliot Higgins – We Are Bellingcat

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Mary Lawson – A Town Solace

April 13, 2022

Laura Price – Single Bald Female

by Team Riverside
Laura Price in front of the Riverside shop window

Thanks to Laura Price for popping in to sign her new novel, Single Bald Female. Good luck with the book, Laura!

April 13, 2022

All Through the Night by Polly Faber and Harriet Hobday

by Team Riverside
cover of All Through the Night

Paperback, Nosy Crow, £6.99, out now

All Through the Night is a cheerful and entertaining picture book for young children about “people who work while we sleep”.  We find out about cleaners and paramedics, journalists and bakers, and all kinds of folk who make our lives possible.  It is a friendly and useful explanation about busy life carrying on even while we sleep.

The narrator’s mum goes out every evening to work, driving her big orange bus, and helping people get about.  She is the one who helps everyone get to work and get home again.  There is also a shout out for mums and dads of newborn babies who have to stay up before their babies have learned to sleep at night.  The police are called to a noisy street but it is only a fox family rampaging through the bins. 

All Through the Night is a treat for repeated re-reading.  Children will love to spot the bus on every page; the delivery driver from the previous page dropping flour and sugar to the baker; the fox cubs who’ve been at the bins disappearing behind a bush while the railway repair worker use their digger.

For children whose caregivers work nights, I think this will be an affirming thing – to see their person’s work in a story book.

I love that the author and illustrator in their book dedications both thank people who work at night.  This fits with the very personal and sincere feel of the book, which has the same joy as the classic Richard Scarry book What do People Do All Day? (https://uk.bookshop.org/books/what-do-people-do-all-day/9780007353699) but it is much more realistic!

Review by Bethan

April 11, 2022

Easter opening times

by Team Riverside

Happy Easter!

We will be open:

Good Friday 15 April – 11 to 5

Easter Saturday 16 April – 10 to 6

Easter Sunday – CLOSED

Easter Monday – 11 to 5

April 10, 2022

Bestsellers 03/04/2022-10/04/2022

by Team Riverside

Elif Shafak – Island of The Missing Trees

Michael Lewis – The Premonition

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Bella Mackie – How To Kill Your Family

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Eckhart Tolle – The Power of Now

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Eliot Higgins – We Are Bellingcat

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Michael Bond – Paddington

Stanley Tucci – Taste

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Dave Eggers – The Every

David Baddiel – Jews Don’t Count

April 5, 2022

Galatea – a Short Story by Madeline Miller

by Team Riverside
book cover of Galatea

Hardback, Bloomsbury, £6.99, out now

This is an excellent new short story from the author of Circe and The Song of Achilles.  I’ve not read those yet but I will do now, having read Galatea.

Galatea is being kept a virtual prisoner in hospital on the wishes of her husband, with the complicity of the medical staff.  Her husband, a sculptor, created her out of stone to be his perfect woman: compliant, beautiful, and with no will or wishes of her own.  But Galatea is developing a secret plan for her own freedom, and that of her young daughter Paphos.

The story is Miller’s response to Ovid’s telling of the Pygmalion myth: “…others (myself included) have been disturbed by the deeply misogynist implications of the story.  Pygmalion’s happy ending is only happy if you accept a number of repulsive ideas: that the only good woman is one who has no self beyond pleasing a man, the fetishization of female sexual purity, the connection of ‘snowy’ ivory with perfection, the elevation of male fantasy over female reality”.

Miller offers a sharp take on abuse and control in relationships, and specifically men’s control of, and ideas about, women.  As Galatea says: “The thing is, I don’t think my husband expected me to be able to talk”. 

Accordingly here, some of the content is challenging.  This is appropriate given the subject.  I don’t always find fiction with mythical or fantasy elements convincing, but the ease and confidence with which this is written makes Galatea feel very real.  I felt like Galatea herself was demanding that I witness her struggle, her cleverness, and her courage.

Issued in a beautiful small blue hardback form, it would make a great gift for the right person.  I immediately reread it on finishing and it was even better the second time around.  A vital read.

Review by Bethan

April 2, 2022

Bestsellers 26th March – 2nd April

by Team Riverside

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Kae Tempest – On Connection

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Marion Billet – Busy London

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Matthew Green – Shadowlands

Daisy Buchanan – Careering

Tom Chivers – London Clay

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Agatha Christie – Miss Marple and Mystery

Michael Lewis – The Premonition

March 31, 2022

Paradais by Fernanda Melchor, trans. Sophie Hughes

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Fitzcarraldo Editions, £10.99, out now

The second of Fernanda Melchor’s novels to be translated into English and also longlisted for the International Booker Prize, Paradais is a slight volume nonetheless packed with violence and tension. Polo, the protagonist, is a teenage alcoholic stuck in a dead-end job working as a gardener for a luxury housing complex. He is abused by his mother and his boss and his only real friend is the spoilt Franco, an overweight internet addict with a dangerous obsession with his neighbour, an attractive married woman. Polo’s anger and frustration with his family, his employer sends him spiralling towards destruction.

I haven’t read such a brilliant and horrifying study of the extremes of capitalism and machismo since American Psycho. Melchor’s description is rich and visceral, the oppressive heat outside and claustrophobic house where Polo lives are rendered in complex claustrophobic detail.

Paradais is a shocking and brilliant follow-up to Hurricane Season, I highly recommend this novel for fans of Ottessa Moshfegh and Bret Easton Ellis.

Review by Phoebe

March 29, 2022

Gretel the Wonder Mammoth by Kim Hillyard

by Team Riverside
Gretel the Wonder Mammoth book cover

Paperback, Ladybird, £6.99, out now

Gretel emerges from the ice to be feted as a Wonder Mammoth: an instant celebrity who makes lots of friends.  But she is the last mammoth on Earth, which is always going to be tricky…

Her friends love her, as she is kind and strong and tells the best bedtime stories.  When everyone thinks you are jolly and strong, how can you tell them that you are “scared… and sad… and worried… all at the same time”?

Kim Hillyard shows us that sometimes the bravest thing you can do is let your friends know how you are feeling, and that this is how things can start to get better.  The friendly illustrations bring Greta’s world to life, and I found the colour palette warm, lively, and comforting.

Gretel’s friends prove most useful.  They listen carefully, stroke her woolly feet, answer her questions, and help her find new things that she enjoys.  Gretel is still the last mammoth, but she has reclaimed her Wonder and is no longer alone.

This sensitive picture book for young children is one of those brilliant things, a book that is really for all humans.

Review by Bethan

March 28, 2022

Don’t Ask the Dragon by Lemn Sissay and Greg Stobbs

by Team Riverside
Don't Ask the Dragon book cover

Paperback, Canongate, £6.99, out now

Alem is alone on his birthday and asks many different creatures what he should do – he is wondering where he should call home.  None of them know but they all give him the same advice: “don’t ask the dragon – he will eat you!”

Alem is one to think for himself, so when he meets the dragon, he listens.  The dragon turns out to be helpful, interesting… and vegetarian.

From celebrated poet and memoirist Lemn Sissay, with engrossing pictures from Greg Stobbs, this is an optimistic picture book for young children.  A fun rhyming book to read aloud, this would be perfect for storytime.

With the new animal friends he’s made, Alem celebrates his birthday and discovers that home was inside him all along.  For readers of Lemn Sissay’s excellent autobiography My Name is Why, the themes in this book will be especially resonant (https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/aug/29/my-name-is-why-lemn-sissay-review).  To find your own place when you are alone can be extremely hard, but also sometimes joyful.

The party pictured at the end of the book is one I would very much like to go to.

Review by Bethan

March 27, 2022

Milo Imagines the World by Matt de la Peña and Christian Robinson

by Team Riverside
Milo Imagines the World book cover

Paperback, Two Hoots, £7.99, out now

We travel on the subway with young boy Milo and his sister, on a journey they make every month.  It’s a trip that causes complex emotions…”as usual, Milo is a shook-up soda.  Excitement stacked on top of worry on top of confusion on top of love.  To keep himself from bursting, he studies the faces around him and makes pictures of their lives”.

The delicious and engaging illustrations in this picture book for young children draw us into Milo’s world.  Imagining the stories of the strangers he sees on the train, he assumes that a smartly dressed boy lives in a castle with servants, and that a woman in a wedding dress is off to marry a man a city hall.  But why do we assume these things about people we don’t know?  Can Milo reimagine the stories he gives to people?

When it emerges that he and the other boy are both visiting their mums in prison, Milo finds out that there are so many ways to imagine the lives of others. 

One of the most moving and cheerful things for me about Milo Imagines the World was the effortless portrayal of family love transcending and enduring through imprisonment.  I also liked that Milo processed what was going on through drawing pictures of what he was thinking, which his mum got to enjoy during his visit.

Not even remotely preachy, this book is a complete delight.  And it might make you see your own tube journey, and the people you’re sharing it with, in a much more interesting way.

Review by Bethan

March 27, 2022

Bestsellers 21 to 26 March

by Team Riverside
Tom Burgis Kleptopia book cover

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Chitra Soundar – Sona Sharma Looking After Planet Earth

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and the Sun

Catherine Belton – Putin’s People

Colm Tóibín- The Magician

Caroline Barron – A Map of Medieval London

Naomi Ishiguro – Common Ground

Madeline Miller – Galatea

Kes Gray – Daisy and the Trouble With London

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Janice Hallett – The Twyford Code

George Orwell – 1984

Stanley Tucci – Taste

David Baddiel – Jews Don’t Count

Peppa Pig Emergency Heroes Sticker Book

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March 23, 2022

Happy Mother’s Day!

by Team Riverside
photo of the Mother's Day window display, with cards, books and flowers

We have a brilliant range of cards, gifts and wrap for all your Mother’s Day needs this year. Suzanne’s cheerful window display has us all smiling too.

If you need any book recommendations, just come and ask!

March 20, 2022

Bestsellers 13th – 20th of March

by Team Riverside

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Catherine Belton – Putin’s People

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Marion Billet – Busy London

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

John Preston – Fall

Eliot Higgins – We Are Bellingcat

Charlotte Mendelson – The Exhibitionist

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Tim Marshal – The Power of Geography

Rebecca F. John – Fannie

David Baddiel – Jews Don’t Count

Siobhan Dowd – The London Eye Mystery

March 15, 2022

Bullet Train by Kotaro Isaka

by Team Riverside
book cover Bullet Train

Paperback, Vintage, £8.99, out now

As the Shinkansen bullet train speeds out of Tokyo, several of those on board seem to be on missions to kill.  But who will kill, who will die, and why?

This is a speedy and satisfying locked-room crime novel.  It’s not clear at the outset how the disparate group of characters are connected.  What links a father bent on revenge, a hitman obsessed with Thomas the Tank Engine, and a professional killer who’s concerned that he’s unlucky and wants to quit?  And what are the roles of those off the train, including a woman who is phoning with instructions?

So many questions, and Bullet Train presents an engaging mystery for readers to try and solve.  It’s violent, but given the sheer number of murderers this is perhaps not surprising.  This was part of my ongoing Japanese crime reading jag, following on from The Aosawa Murders (https://riversidebookshop.co.uk/2020/07/25/the-aosawa-murders-by-riku-onda/).  Isaka is a prize winning author in Japan, and the movie starring Brad Pitt and Sandra Bullock is due out this summer (see https://www.imdb.com/title/tt12593682/).

For an escapist and entertaining crime read, this is a good choice.

Review by Bethan

March 14, 2022

New signed copies in!

by Team Riverside
book cover Your Story Matters

Margaret Atwood – Burning Questions

Lucy Caldwell – These Days

Marlon James – Moon Witch Spider King

Charlotte Mendelson – The Exhibitionist

Graham Robb – France: an Adventure History

Julia Samuel – Every Family Has a Story

Nikesh Shukla – Your Story Matters

March 13, 2022

Cold Enough For Snow by Jessica Au

by Team Riverside

Fitzcarraldo Editions, £9.99 paperback, out now

Cold Enough for Snow is a startling and subtle mediation on family and belonging from the winner of the inaugural Fitzcarraldo Novel Prize. It is incredibly vivid and sensuous but it is also a gentle read, Au takes us movingly through different scenes, unhurried by plot. At times it’s reminiscent of a series of anecdotes, scenes from the life of the narrator and the narrator’s family are strung together through the conversations between mother and daughter as they wander through Tokyo, eating dinner, visiting tourist attractions. The prose radiates quiet beauty, every detail from the weather to the food that they eat is realised in precise detail. I highly recommend this novel for fans of Rachel Cusk and Sheila Heti.

Review by Phoebe

March 11, 2022

Bestsellers 4th – 11th March

by Team Riverside

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Margaret Atwood – Burning Questions

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Patrick Radden Keefe – Empire of Pain

Natasha Lunn – Conversations on Love

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Frank Tallis – The Act of Living

Georgia Pritchett – My Mess is a Bit of a Life

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Adam Rutherford – Control

Michelle Zauner – Crying in H Mart

Victoria Mas – The Mad Woman’s Ball

Coco Mellors – Cleopatra and Frankenstein

March 4, 2022

Bestsellers 25th February – 3rd March

by Team Riverside

Tim Marshall – The Power of Geography

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Frank Tallis – The Act of Living

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Maggie O’Farrell – Hamnet

Patrick Radden Keefe – Empire of Pain

Karen McManus – One Of Us is Lying

David Baddiel – Jews Don’t Count

Gertrude Stein – Food

bell hooks – All About Love

John Preston – Fall

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

Natasha Lunn – Conversations On Love

Marian Keyes – Rachel’s Holiday

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

February 25, 2022

Bestsellers 18th February – 25th February

by Team Riverside

Natasha Lunn – Conversations On Love

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

F. Scott Fitzgerald – The Great Gatsby

John Preston – Fall

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

Marian Keyes – Again, Rachel

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Hanya Yanigahara – A Little Life

Cho Nam-Joo – Kim Jiyoung, Born 1982

Marion Billet – Busy London

Adam Kay – This Is Going To Hurt