Archive for ‘Fiction’

August 8, 2022

Bestsellers 1st August – 8th August

by Team Riverside

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Elif Shafak – The Island of The Missing Trees

John Spurling – Arcadian Nights

Julia Donaldson – Counting Creatures

Kaouther Adimi – A Bookshop in Algiers

Cecily Gayford – Murder By The Seaside

Bella Mackie – How To Kill Your Family

Alice Oseman – Heartstopper Volume 2

Charlotte Higgins – Greek Myths

Tom Chivers – London Clay

Oliver Burkeman – Four Thousand Weeks

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Selby Wynn Schwartz – After Sappho

Michael Bond – A Bear Called Paddington

July 31, 2022

Bestsellers 24th July – 31st July

by Team Riverside

Delia Owens – Where The Crawdads Sing

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Jessie Burton – The House of Fortune

Sayaka Murata – Life Ceremony

Kaouther Adimi – A Bookshop in Algiers

Bella Mackie – How To Kill Your Family

Pat Barker – The Women of Troy

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Mieko Kawakami – All The Lovers In The Night

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Malcolm Gladwell – The Bomber Mafia

Yaa Gyasi – Transcendent Kingdom

Elif Shafak – The Island of The Missing Trees

Colleen Hoover – It Ends With Us

Marion Billet – There Are 101 Things To Find In London

July 30, 2022

Milk Teeth by Jessica Andrews

by Team Riverside

Sceptre, Hardback, £16.99, Out Now

Milk Teeth is the stunning new novel from Jessica Andrews, the author of the Portico Prizewinning Saltwater. On the surface it might seem like Milk Teeth is a straightforward love story, half the novel is addressed to ‘you’ the object of the narrators’ affections, but this is just one of the strands of story that is braided into this novel. There are also vivid reflections on childhood and the oppressive demands made on young women, to look, talk, and act a certain way. The narrators’ awareness of her class background and her financial precarity haunt the story, food also plays a crucial role, the meals that the central couple eat together are lovingly described in perfect detail. Food is partially used as a metaphor for embracing desire, allowing oneself to have what you want the most without guilt, without starving yourself in penance. In a way the love story is between the narrator and her own self, Milk Teeth asks what does it mean to embrace love, change, to put yourself and your own desires first?

This is a beautifully written feminist read for the Summer. In a time when cool, spare prose is the dominant mode, Milk Teeth is hot, physical and sensory. I highly recommend this in particular for fans of Elena Ferrante and Sally Rooney.

July 17, 2022

Bestsellers 10th – 17th July

by Team Riverside

Pat Barker – The Women of Troy

Oliver Burkeman – Four Thousand Weeks

Malcolm Gladwell – The Bomber Mafia

Miranda Cowley Heller – The Paper Palace

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Keith Ridgway – A Shock

Charlotte Higgins – Greek Myths

Tom Chivers – London Clay

Kaouther Adimi – A Bookshop in Algiers

Cecily Gayford – Murder By The Seaside

Ruth Ozeki – The Book of Form and Emptiness

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Bella Mackie – How To Kill Your Family

Elizabeth Day – Magpie

July 10, 2022

Bestsellers 3rd – 10th July

by Team Riverside

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Tom Chivers – London Clay

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Adam Hargreaves – Mr Men in London

Kaouther Adimi – A Bookshop in Algiers

Bella Mackie – How To Kill Your Family

Malcolm Gladwell – Blink

Elizabeth Day – Magpie

Lea Ypi – Free

Elif Shafak – The Island of The Missing Trees

Miranda Cowley Heller – The Paper Palace

John Le Carre – Silverview

Sylvia Plath – The Bell Jar

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

July 8, 2022

Lapvona by Ottessa Moshfegh

by Team Riverside

Jonathon Cape, Hardback, £14.99, out now

Ottessa Moshfegh’s latest novel is set in the fictional eastern European village of Lapvona, sometime in the Middle Ages. Lapvona is dirty, highly religious and poverty stricken. It is presided over by a Trumpian lord, Villam, who only cares about what joke he can make next. Villam is unwilling or unable to notice when his subjects are starving and thirsty whilst he hoards water in the grounds of his palace. In a departure from Moshfegh’s usual close first-person narration, Lapvona moves through a large cast of characters. Other figures include Marek, a disabled boy who is abused by his religious father, Father Barnabas the corrupt town priest, and Ina, a sometime apothecary and witch.

Moshfegh revisits some of the themes of her early work, the various ways that wealth corrupts, visceral depictions of the body, strange and unlikeable narrators. But the medieval setting is a striking departure from her earlier work and this new direction pays off in spades. Lapvona is a fictional setting but Moshfegh’s detailed portrayal of life for the inhabitants of Lapvona feels extremely vivid. The characters, while unsympathetic, are universally compelling. The gory elements are expertly deployed, as beautifully created as they are horrifying. The content is not for the faint of heart, (there is blood, guts, and even cannibalism) but I highly recommend this fantastically well-written novel, particularly for fans of Moshfegh’s first novella McGlue.

Review by Phoebe

July 3, 2022

Needle by Patrice Lawrence

by Team Riverside
book cover of Needle

Paperback, Barrington Stoke, £7.99, out now

Charlene is a 15-year-old Black girl living in foster care.  She loves her younger sister Kandi, who she’s not seen for two years, and she loves knitting.  The craft relaxes her and keeps her grounded as her world changes around her over and over again.  But her foster mum’s adult son torments her by destroying the gift she’s knitting for her sister, and before she knows it she has retaliated with her knitting needle.

Needle is a gripping and revealing young adult novel, by Riverside favourite Patrice Lawrence.  I could absolutely see how Charlene got into the situations in the story, and why she reacted as she did.  While easy to read, with a compelling narrative, Needle raises critical issues around the criminalisation of young people, about childhood trauma, and about serious failings in our care and policing systems. 

Charlene is reflective and realistic on her lack of control over her own life: “Annie [her foster mother] agrees that me and Kandi should see each other, but she says we can’t always control the world.  Sometimes we just have to stand back and work out how to pull it back into a shape that’s good for us.  That’s easier for people like Annie than me.  She doesn’t have folks always shaping her world for her, then expecting her to smile and say it fits”.

The publisher has given three words on the book to describe the content – remorse, foster care, and justice.  They could easily have added policing, bereavement and trauma.  The brilliant cover made me want to read the book, not least the intriguing ‘sorrynotsorry’ motif.  Whether and when to apologise comes to be of critical importance throughout the story.  Perhaps you feel remorse or, conversely, don’t feel you’ve anything to be sorry for but those with power over you are urging you to play the game.

It’s relevant that Needle is dedicated to someone that the author describes as “bringing people together to change this”.  I hope that that this change can happen, and also that some of Lawrence’s readers will find themselves and their experiences here: it is vital that we can find our lives in books sometimes.

Attending the launch for Needle, I found out that it was inspired by Lawrence’s work with the Howard League for Penal Reform.  This would help explain just how believable the sections in the police station are.  On the excellent panel at the launch, several young people who had been in care generously shared their experiences, and all said that they had found the book very relatable.  I first came across the book when it was recommended by Charlie at the excellent Hastings Bookshop.

What stuck with me after reading Needle was the on and off role of so many adults in Charlene’s life.  Some listen, some don’t.  Some seem to understand, but more don’t (or won’t, or can’t).  A few are permanent though limited in what they can do to help, like Charlene’s auntie, or hostile, like Kandi’s dad.  Charlene herself is a constant, remaining funny and incisive throughout, even as she is clearly still a kid: “Sometimes I think my name is really Confidential instead of Charlene, because I hear that word so much.  Everything I say is supposed to be confidential, but somehow everyone still seems to know my business”.  In the end the questions of saying sorry, feeling remorse, playing the game and being true to yourself remain complex for Charlene. Outstanding.

Review by Bethan

July 3, 2022

Bestsellers 26th June – 3rd July

by Team Riverside

Ruth Ozeki – The Book of Form and Emptiness

Bella Mackie – How To Kill Your Family

Eliot Higgins – We Are Bellingcat

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Cecily Gayford – Murder By The Seaside

Malcolm Gladwell – The Bomber Mafia

Lea Ypi – Free

Elizabeth Day – Magpie

Daniel Kahneman – Noise

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Katherine Rundell – The Explorer

Lauren Groff – Matrix

Maggie Shipstead – Great Circle

Gwendoline Riley – My Phantoms

Agatha Christie – And Then There Were None

June 19, 2022

Bestsellers 12th – 19th June

by Team Riverside

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Bella Mackie – How To Kill Your Family

Ruth Ozeki – The Book of Form and Emptiness

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Tee Dobinson – The Tower Bridge Cat

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Pat Barker – The Women of Troy

Elif Shafak – The Island of The Missing Trees

Sally Rooney – Normal People

The Secret Barrister – Nothing But The Truth

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Tom Chivers – London Clay

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

John le Carre – Silverview

June 12, 2022

Bestsellers 5th June – 12th June

by Team Riverside

Pat Barker – The Women of Troy

Jonathon Lee – The Great Mistake

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Oliver Burkeman – Four Thousand Weeks

Malcolm Gladwell – The Bomber Mafia

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Elif Shafak – The Isand of The Missing Trees

Miranda Cowley Heller – The Paper Palace

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Alice Oseman – Heartstopper: Volume One

Phil Knight – Shoe Dog

Marion Billet – Busy London

Elizabeth Mcneal – Circus of Wonders

June 9, 2022

Vladimir by Julia May Jonas

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Picador, £14.99, out now

A complexly wrought debut novel by Julia May Jonas, Vladimir is the story of an unnamed female professor whose husband is facing allegations of sexual harassment from his students when she develops an obsession with Vladimir, a promising writer in his own right, who has recently joined the department.

Vladimir forms part of a spring of recent American campus novels along with Lee Cole’s Groundskeeping and Elif Batuman’s Either/Or. The campus setting is alternately lampooned as a greenhouse for elitists and treated as a microcosm for wider society. At first, I was wary of the already well-trod subject matter, abuse of power in academic settings, campus debates over free speech, writer’s feelings of envy towards each other. But Vladimir’s morally ambiguous narrator is far from a cliché. She refuses to see herself as a victim of her husband’s actions, speaks dismissively of his accusers and act manipulatively towards Vladimir, playing on his vulnerability as a man with a troubled wife and a young child.

As an unreliable and, at times unlikeable, narrator she is incredibly well drawn. As the novel develops her ideas and behaviour become increasingly horrifying and last third of Vladimir was wild and unpredictable. Vladimir is complex and surprising debut and I highly recommend it for fans of Ottessa Moshfegh and Rachel Cusk.

June 7, 2022

Granny Came Here on the Empire Windrush by Patrice Lawrence and Camilla Sucre

by Team Riverside
cover of Granny Came Here on the Empire Windrush

Paperback, Nosy Crow, £7.99, out now

Granny Came Here on the Empire Windrush is a completely gorgeous picture book for young primary school age children.  The story is by Riverside favourite Patrice Lawrence (we are particular fans of her young adult mystery, Eight Pieces of Silva).

Ava loves spending time with her Granny.  They sing together and love to spend time with each other.  When Ava needs help to decide which admirable person to dress up as for school, it’s obvious that Granny should help her work this out.  Granny tells Ava all about wonderful women like Mary Seacole, Rosa Parks and Winifred Atwell. 

She starts to talk about her own life, coming to the UK from Trinidad and making her life here.  Ava realises that maybe she doesn’t have to look very far to find someone who has shown real courage.

As Granny looks through her memory box, we learn her story, and the courage that it takes to go so far from your first home and make a new life for yourself.  I loved the emphasis here on family storytelling, and Sucre’s thoughtful illustrations bring the emotions of the narrative to life.  The colour contrasts between the muted new place when Granny is homesick, compared to the vivid colours of her remembered island home, become extra important when she meets her future husband and her new city becomes colourful for her.

I loved the romance of Granny’s relationship: “I met your grandad.  He was the conductor on the bus that took me to work every day.  At first, we would just smile at each other.  Then it was ‘good morning’.  Soon, in spite of the noise in the factory, I looked forward to my morning journey… And my journeys home, when he would cross the whole of London just to come and meet me”.

This reminded me that there is an exhibition I’m keen to go to at the London Transport Museum right now called Legacies: London Transport’s Caribbean Workforce.  The webpage has lots of lovely links to music and other resources which would complement Granny Came Here on the Empire Windrush too.

This is a sensitive and relatable book, tied to the lives of the Windrush generation and their families, but clearly speaking to timeless themes of making new lives and families far from home.  I loved the author’s dedication, which shone through the story too: “To those that come from across the world.  I hope you find love and peace.”

Review by Bethan

June 5, 2022

Bestsellers 29th May – 5th June

by Team Riverside

Bob Mortimer – And Away…

Elif Shafak – The Island of The Missing Trees

Akwaeke Emezi – You Made A Fool of Death With Your Beauty

Mieko Kawakami – All The Lovers In The Night

Douglas Stuart – Young Mungo

Lea Ypi – Free

Elizabeth Day – Magpie

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Kazuo Ishiguro – The Remains of The Day

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Alice Oseman – Loveless

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Mary Wollstonecraft – A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

Bella Mackie – How to Kill Your Family

May 29, 2022

Bestsellers 23rd – 30th May

by Team Riverside
Meg Mason - Sorrow and Bliss

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Sally Rooney – Normal People

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Douglas Stuart – Young Mungo

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Natasha Brown – Assembly

Akwaeke Emezi – You made a Fool of Death with your Beauty

May 26, 2022

Groundskeeping by Lee Cole

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Faber and Faber, £16.99, out now

Groundskeeping is a beautifully written debut novel that contends with questions of class, family and love. Cole’s protagonist Owen is working as a groundskeeper at a university when he meets Alma, a writer who has taken up a prestigious fellowship. Over the course of their relationship Owen is forced to better understand his relationship to his family, his home state and what role he will play in his changing life.

The novel is set in 2016, and Cole handles the political differences between the characters thoughtfully. Owen vehemently disagrees with his mother and stepfather, both Trump supporters, but they show a great deal of kindness to Owen and Alma. Their political views sit in stark contrast with the hospitality they show to Alma, who is Muslim. Cole renders rural Kentucky complexly; this is a contemporary novel that handles the subject of class with such intelligence and care. The rift that develops in Owen and Alma’s relationship is founded in her classism, even though she is a second-generation immigrant she has a comparatively privileged background, she went to an Ivy League college, she mocks Owen when he is accepted to a lesser-known writing fellowship.

The prose is dazzling, the world of the novel is created through gorgeous sensory detail, this is one of the best written debut novels I have read this year.

May 22, 2022

Bestsellers 15th – 22nd of May

by Team Riverside

Elizabeth Strout – Oh William!

Elizabeth Day – Magpie

Elif Shafak – The Island of The Missing Trees

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Marion Billet – Busy London

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Natasha Brown – Assembly

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Maggie O’Farrell – Hamnet

Mieko Kawakami – All The Lovers In The Night

Douglas Stuart – Young Mungo

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Flann O’Brien – The Third Policeman

May 13, 2022

Bestsellers 6th – 13th May

by Team Riverside

Elizabeth Strout – Oh William!

John Le Carre – Silverview

Elif Shafak – The Island of The Missing Trees

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Cecily Gayford – Murder by The Seaside

Elizabeth Day – Magpie

Sally Rooney – Conversations With Friends

Daisy Buchanan – Insatiable

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Marion Billet – Busy London

bell hooks – All About Love

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Chris Power – A Lonely Man

May 8, 2022

Bestsellers 1st – 8th May

by Team Riverside

Elizabeth Strout – Oh William!

John Le Carre – Silverview

Emily St. John Mandel – Sea of Tranquility

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

bell hooks – All About Love

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Oliver Burkeman – Four Thousand Weeks

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

M.H. Eccleston – The Trust

Min Jin Lee – Pachinko

Clara Vulliamy – Marshmallow Pie: The Cat Superstar

Oliver Jeffers – Here We Are

Elizabeth Day – Magpie

May 1, 2022

Bestsellers 24th April – 1st May

by Team Riverside

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Daisy Buchanan – Insatiable

Marion Billet – Busy London

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Alice Oseman – Heartstopper Volume 2

Douglas Stuart – Young Mungo

Joseph Hone – The Paper Chase

Nicholas Nassim Taleb – Antifragile

Shirley Jackson – The Missing Girl

Catherine Belton – Putin’s People

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Emily Danforth – Plain Bad Heroines

April 26, 2022

New Signed Copies

by Team Riverside
Cover of book None of This is Serious

So excited to have all these new signed copies in the shop…

Jessie Greengrass – The High House

Jeremy Atherton Lin – Gay Bar

Emily St. John Mandel – Sea of Tranquility

Maddie Mortimer – Maps of Our Spectacular Bodies

Catherine Prasifka – None of This is Serious

Laura Price – Single Bald Female

Ali Smith – Companion Piece

Nina Stibbe – One Day I Shall Astonish the World

Douglas Stuart – Young Mungo

Charmaine Wilkerson – Black Cake

April 25, 2022

Sea of Tranquility by Emily St. John Mandel

by Team Riverside
cover of Sea of Tranquility

Hardback, Picador, £14.99, out now

Three people, separately and at different points over three hundred years, experience an anomaly.  In the middle of their ordinary lives, there is an instant of blackness, a violin, a strange sound.  Then everything reverts to normal.  One of these is an exile from England in Canada in 1812; one a novelist visiting Earth on a book tour; one is Vincent, a young woman walking through a wilderness.  Also linking them is the detective Gaspery-Jacques Roberts from the 25th century, who is investigating this glitch in time and space.

Sea of Tranquility follows St. John Mandel’s outstanding novel The Glass Hotel (see https://riversidebookshop.co.uk/2020/08/05/the-glass-hotel-by-emily-st-john-mandel/).  Several characters, including Vincent and Mirella, appear here.  I shouted out loud, I was so delighted to see Vincent again.  The humanity and relatability of the characters is clear, so much so that their extraordinary circumstances came to seem normal to me as I read.  Off world colonies and multiple worlds are made familiar to us by the concerns of those living in them: fear in the face of danger, suspicion of overarching authorities, affection for home, and the pull of those you love.  Olive, visiting Earth and more specifically Salt Lake City, says: “There’s something to be said for looking up at a clear blue sky and knowing that it isn’t a dome”.

Like Octavia E. Butler, whose novels I am belatedly discovering, St. John Mandel uses her futuristic work to explore ideas about ethics and responsibility.  If you knew what was going to happen to everyone you met, would you be able to resist intervening in their lives?  Who gets to decide what is the ‘right’ world, the ‘correct’ timeline, and why?

The novelist Olive Llewellyn speaks of pandemics to her book tour audiences, and the Covid-19 pandemic features as a historical incident.  But as a new virus pops up on the news during the tour, her reactions to it feel very familiar to us.  As do her feelings, in 2203, being asked about being away from her young daughter for work.  A woman praises Olive’s husband for looking after her daughter.  “Forgive me,” Olive said, “I fear there’s a problem with my translator bot.  I thought you said he was kind to care for his own child”.

I enjoyed this novel so much.  There is also a good cat in this book.

Review by Bethan

April 24, 2022

Bestsellers 17th – 24th April

by Team Riverside

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Eliot Higgins – We Are Bellingcat

Jeremy Atherton Lin – Gay Bar

Tim Marshall – Prisoners of Geography

Julian Barnes – Elizabeth Finch

Ray Bradbury – Fahrenheit 451

Catherine Belton – Putin’s People

Sarah Winman – Still Life

Bella Mackie – How to Kill Your Family

Emily Danforth – Plain Bad Heroines

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Luke Kennard – The Answer to Everything

Albert Camus – The Plague

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

April 18, 2022

Bestsellers 11th April – 18th April

by Team Riverside

Elif Shafak – The Island of The Missing Trees

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Stanley Tucci – Taste

Ali Smith – Companion Piece

Douglas Stuart – Young Mungo

Bella Mackie – How To Kill Your Family

Patrick Radden Keefe – Empire of Pain

Michael Lewis – The Premonition

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Frank Tallis – The Act of Living

Adam Hargreaves – Mr. Men in London

Eliot Higgins – We Are Bellingcat

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Mary Lawson – A Town Solace

April 13, 2022

Laura Price – Single Bald Female

by Team Riverside
Laura Price in front of the Riverside shop window

Thanks to Laura Price for popping in to sign her new novel, Single Bald Female. Good luck with the book, Laura!

April 5, 2022

Galatea – a Short Story by Madeline Miller

by Team Riverside
book cover of Galatea

Hardback, Bloomsbury, £6.99, out now

This is an excellent new short story from the author of Circe and The Song of Achilles.  I’ve not read those yet but I will do now, having read Galatea.

Galatea is being kept a virtual prisoner in hospital on the wishes of her husband, with the complicity of the medical staff.  Her husband, a sculptor, created her out of stone to be his perfect woman: compliant, beautiful, and with no will or wishes of her own.  But Galatea is developing a secret plan for her own freedom, and that of her young daughter Paphos.

The story is Miller’s response to Ovid’s telling of the Pygmalion myth: “…others (myself included) have been disturbed by the deeply misogynist implications of the story.  Pygmalion’s happy ending is only happy if you accept a number of repulsive ideas: that the only good woman is one who has no self beyond pleasing a man, the fetishization of female sexual purity, the connection of ‘snowy’ ivory with perfection, the elevation of male fantasy over female reality”.

Miller offers a sharp take on abuse and control in relationships, and specifically men’s control of, and ideas about, women.  As Galatea says: “The thing is, I don’t think my husband expected me to be able to talk”. 

Accordingly here, some of the content is challenging.  This is appropriate given the subject.  I don’t always find fiction with mythical or fantasy elements convincing, but the ease and confidence with which this is written makes Galatea feel very real.  I felt like Galatea herself was demanding that I witness her struggle, her cleverness, and her courage.

Issued in a beautiful small blue hardback form, it would make a great gift for the right person.  I immediately reread it on finishing and it was even better the second time around.  A vital read.

Review by Bethan

April 2, 2022

Bestsellers 26th March – 2nd April

by Team Riverside

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Kae Tempest – On Connection

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Marion Billet – Busy London

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Matthew Green – Shadowlands

Daisy Buchanan – Careering

Tom Chivers – London Clay

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Agatha Christie – Miss Marple and Mystery

Michael Lewis – The Premonition

March 31, 2022

Paradais by Fernanda Melchor, trans. Sophie Hughes

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Fitzcarraldo Editions, £10.99, out now

The second of Fernanda Melchor’s novels to be translated into English and also longlisted for the International Booker Prize, Paradais is a slight volume nonetheless packed with violence and tension. Polo, the protagonist, is a teenage alcoholic stuck in a dead-end job working as a gardener for a luxury housing complex. He is abused by his mother and his boss and his only real friend is the spoilt Franco, an overweight internet addict with a dangerous obsession with his neighbour, an attractive married woman. Polo’s anger and frustration with his family, his employer sends him spiralling towards destruction.

I haven’t read such a brilliant and horrifying study of the extremes of capitalism and machismo since American Psycho. Melchor’s description is rich and visceral, the oppressive heat outside and claustrophobic house where Polo lives are rendered in complex claustrophobic detail.

Paradais is a shocking and brilliant follow-up to Hurricane Season, I highly recommend this novel for fans of Ottessa Moshfegh and Bret Easton Ellis.

Review by Phoebe

March 20, 2022

Bestsellers 13th – 20th of March

by Team Riverside

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Catherine Belton – Putin’s People

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Marion Billet – Busy London

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

John Preston – Fall

Eliot Higgins – We Are Bellingcat

Charlotte Mendelson – The Exhibitionist

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Tim Marshal – The Power of Geography

Rebecca F. John – Fannie

David Baddiel – Jews Don’t Count

Siobhan Dowd – The London Eye Mystery

March 15, 2022

Bullet Train by Kotaro Isaka

by Team Riverside
book cover Bullet Train

Paperback, Vintage, £8.99, out now

As the Shinkansen bullet train speeds out of Tokyo, several of those on board seem to be on missions to kill.  But who will kill, who will die, and why?

This is a speedy and satisfying locked-room crime novel.  It’s not clear at the outset how the disparate group of characters are connected.  What links a father bent on revenge, a hitman obsessed with Thomas the Tank Engine, and a professional killer who’s concerned that he’s unlucky and wants to quit?  And what are the roles of those off the train, including a woman who is phoning with instructions?

So many questions, and Bullet Train presents an engaging mystery for readers to try and solve.  It’s violent, but given the sheer number of murderers this is perhaps not surprising.  This was part of my ongoing Japanese crime reading jag, following on from The Aosawa Murders (https://riversidebookshop.co.uk/2020/07/25/the-aosawa-murders-by-riku-onda/).  Isaka is a prize winning author in Japan, and the movie starring Brad Pitt and Sandra Bullock is due out this summer (see https://www.imdb.com/title/tt12593682/).

For an escapist and entertaining crime read, this is a good choice.

Review by Bethan

March 14, 2022

New signed copies in!

by Team Riverside
book cover Your Story Matters

Margaret Atwood – Burning Questions

Lucy Caldwell – These Days

Marlon James – Moon Witch Spider King

Charlotte Mendelson – The Exhibitionist

Graham Robb – France: an Adventure History

Julia Samuel – Every Family Has a Story

Nikesh Shukla – Your Story Matters