Archive for ‘Fiction’

May 13, 2022

Bestsellers 6th – 13th May

by Team Riverside

Elizabeth Strout – Oh William!

John Le Carre – Silverview

Elif Shafak – The Island of The Missing Trees

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Cecily Gayford – Murder by The Seaside

Elizabeth Day – Magpie

Sally Rooney – Conversations With Friends

Daisy Buchanan – Insatiable

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Marion Billet – Busy London

bell hooks – All About Love

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Chris Power – A Lonely Man

May 8, 2022

Bestsellers 1st – 8th May

by Team Riverside

Elizabeth Strout – Oh William!

John Le Carre – Silverview

Emily St. John Mandel – Sea of Tranquility

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

bell hooks – All About Love

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Oliver Burkeman – Four Thousand Weeks

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

M.H. Eccleston – The Trust

Min Jin Lee – Pachinko

Clara Vulliamy – Marshmallow Pie: The Cat Superstar

Oliver Jeffers – Here We Are

Elizabeth Day – Magpie

May 1, 2022

Bestsellers 24th April – 1st May

by Team Riverside

Meg Mason – Sorrow and Bliss

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Daisy Buchanan – Insatiable

Marion Billet – Busy London

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Alice Oseman – Heartstopper Volume 2

Douglas Stuart – Young Mungo

Joseph Hone – The Paper Chase

Nicholas Nassim Taleb – Antifragile

Shirley Jackson – The Missing Girl

Catherine Belton – Putin’s People

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Emily Danforth – Plain Bad Heroines

April 26, 2022

New Signed Copies

by Team Riverside
Cover of book None of This is Serious

So excited to have all these new signed copies in the shop…

Jessie Greengrass – The High House

Jeremy Atherton Lin – Gay Bar

Emily St. John Mandel – Sea of Tranquility

Maddie Mortimer – Maps of Our Spectacular Bodies

Catherine Prasifka – None of This is Serious

Laura Price – Single Bald Female

Ali Smith – Companion Piece

Nina Stibbe – One Day I Shall Astonish the World

Douglas Stuart – Young Mungo

Charmaine Wilkerson – Black Cake

April 25, 2022

Sea of Tranquility by Emily St. John Mandel

by Team Riverside
cover of Sea of Tranquility

Hardback, Picador, £14.99, out now

Three people, separately and at different points over three hundred years, experience an anomaly.  In the middle of their ordinary lives, there is an instant of blackness, a violin, a strange sound.  Then everything reverts to normal.  One of these is an exile from England in Canada in 1812; one a novelist visiting Earth on a book tour; one is Vincent, a young woman walking through a wilderness.  Also linking them is the detective Gaspery-Jacques Roberts from the 25th century, who is investigating this glitch in time and space.

Sea of Tranquility follows St. John Mandel’s outstanding novel The Glass Hotel (see https://riversidebookshop.co.uk/2020/08/05/the-glass-hotel-by-emily-st-john-mandel/).  Several characters, including Vincent and Mirella, appear here.  I shouted out loud, I was so delighted to see Vincent again.  The humanity and relatability of the characters is clear, so much so that their extraordinary circumstances came to seem normal to me as I read.  Off world colonies and multiple worlds are made familiar to us by the concerns of those living in them: fear in the face of danger, suspicion of overarching authorities, affection for home, and the pull of those you love.  Olive, visiting Earth and more specifically Salt Lake City, says: “There’s something to be said for looking up at a clear blue sky and knowing that it isn’t a dome”.

Like Octavia E. Butler, whose novels I am belatedly discovering, St. John Mandel uses her futuristic work to explore ideas about ethics and responsibility.  If you knew what was going to happen to everyone you met, would you be able to resist intervening in their lives?  Who gets to decide what is the ‘right’ world, the ‘correct’ timeline, and why?

The novelist Olive Llewellyn speaks of pandemics to her book tour audiences, and the Covid-19 pandemic features as a historical incident.  But as a new virus pops up on the news during the tour, her reactions to it feel very familiar to us.  As do her feelings, in 2203, being asked about being away from her young daughter for work.  A woman praises Olive’s husband for looking after her daughter.  “Forgive me,” Olive said, “I fear there’s a problem with my translator bot.  I thought you said he was kind to care for his own child”.

I enjoyed this novel so much.  There is also a good cat in this book.

Review by Bethan

April 24, 2022

Bestsellers 17th – 24th April

by Team Riverside

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Eliot Higgins – We Are Bellingcat

Jeremy Atherton Lin – Gay Bar

Tim Marshall – Prisoners of Geography

Julian Barnes – Elizabeth Finch

Ray Bradbury – Fahrenheit 451

Catherine Belton – Putin’s People

Sarah Winman – Still Life

Bella Mackie – How to Kill Your Family

Emily Danforth – Plain Bad Heroines

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Luke Kennard – The Answer to Everything

Albert Camus – The Plague

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

April 18, 2022

Bestsellers 11th April – 18th April

by Team Riverside

Elif Shafak – The Island of The Missing Trees

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Stanley Tucci – Taste

Ali Smith – Companion Piece

Douglas Stuart – Young Mungo

Bella Mackie – How To Kill Your Family

Patrick Radden Keefe – Empire of Pain

Michael Lewis – The Premonition

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Frank Tallis – The Act of Living

Adam Hargreaves – Mr. Men in London

Eliot Higgins – We Are Bellingcat

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Mary Lawson – A Town Solace

April 13, 2022

Laura Price – Single Bald Female

by Team Riverside
Laura Price in front of the Riverside shop window

Thanks to Laura Price for popping in to sign her new novel, Single Bald Female. Good luck with the book, Laura!

April 5, 2022

Galatea – a Short Story by Madeline Miller

by Team Riverside
book cover of Galatea

Hardback, Bloomsbury, £6.99, out now

This is an excellent new short story from the author of Circe and The Song of Achilles.  I’ve not read those yet but I will do now, having read Galatea.

Galatea is being kept a virtual prisoner in hospital on the wishes of her husband, with the complicity of the medical staff.  Her husband, a sculptor, created her out of stone to be his perfect woman: compliant, beautiful, and with no will or wishes of her own.  But Galatea is developing a secret plan for her own freedom, and that of her young daughter Paphos.

The story is Miller’s response to Ovid’s telling of the Pygmalion myth: “…others (myself included) have been disturbed by the deeply misogynist implications of the story.  Pygmalion’s happy ending is only happy if you accept a number of repulsive ideas: that the only good woman is one who has no self beyond pleasing a man, the fetishization of female sexual purity, the connection of ‘snowy’ ivory with perfection, the elevation of male fantasy over female reality”.

Miller offers a sharp take on abuse and control in relationships, and specifically men’s control of, and ideas about, women.  As Galatea says: “The thing is, I don’t think my husband expected me to be able to talk”. 

Accordingly here, some of the content is challenging.  This is appropriate given the subject.  I don’t always find fiction with mythical or fantasy elements convincing, but the ease and confidence with which this is written makes Galatea feel very real.  I felt like Galatea herself was demanding that I witness her struggle, her cleverness, and her courage.

Issued in a beautiful small blue hardback form, it would make a great gift for the right person.  I immediately reread it on finishing and it was even better the second time around.  A vital read.

Review by Bethan

April 2, 2022

Bestsellers 26th March – 2nd April

by Team Riverside

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Kae Tempest – On Connection

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Marion Billet – Busy London

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Matthew Green – Shadowlands

Daisy Buchanan – Careering

Tom Chivers – London Clay

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Agatha Christie – Miss Marple and Mystery

Michael Lewis – The Premonition

March 31, 2022

Paradais by Fernanda Melchor, trans. Sophie Hughes

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Fitzcarraldo Editions, £10.99, out now

The second of Fernanda Melchor’s novels to be translated into English and also longlisted for the International Booker Prize, Paradais is a slight volume nonetheless packed with violence and tension. Polo, the protagonist, is a teenage alcoholic stuck in a dead-end job working as a gardener for a luxury housing complex. He is abused by his mother and his boss and his only real friend is the spoilt Franco, an overweight internet addict with a dangerous obsession with his neighbour, an attractive married woman. Polo’s anger and frustration with his family, his employer sends him spiralling towards destruction.

I haven’t read such a brilliant and horrifying study of the extremes of capitalism and machismo since American Psycho. Melchor’s description is rich and visceral, the oppressive heat outside and claustrophobic house where Polo lives are rendered in complex claustrophobic detail.

Paradais is a shocking and brilliant follow-up to Hurricane Season, I highly recommend this novel for fans of Ottessa Moshfegh and Bret Easton Ellis.

Review by Phoebe

March 20, 2022

Bestsellers 13th – 20th of March

by Team Riverside

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Catherine Belton – Putin’s People

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Marion Billet – Busy London

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

John Preston – Fall

Eliot Higgins – We Are Bellingcat

Charlotte Mendelson – The Exhibitionist

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Tim Marshal – The Power of Geography

Rebecca F. John – Fannie

David Baddiel – Jews Don’t Count

Siobhan Dowd – The London Eye Mystery

March 15, 2022

Bullet Train by Kotaro Isaka

by Team Riverside
book cover Bullet Train

Paperback, Vintage, £8.99, out now

As the Shinkansen bullet train speeds out of Tokyo, several of those on board seem to be on missions to kill.  But who will kill, who will die, and why?

This is a speedy and satisfying locked-room crime novel.  It’s not clear at the outset how the disparate group of characters are connected.  What links a father bent on revenge, a hitman obsessed with Thomas the Tank Engine, and a professional killer who’s concerned that he’s unlucky and wants to quit?  And what are the roles of those off the train, including a woman who is phoning with instructions?

So many questions, and Bullet Train presents an engaging mystery for readers to try and solve.  It’s violent, but given the sheer number of murderers this is perhaps not surprising.  This was part of my ongoing Japanese crime reading jag, following on from The Aosawa Murders (https://riversidebookshop.co.uk/2020/07/25/the-aosawa-murders-by-riku-onda/).  Isaka is a prize winning author in Japan, and the movie starring Brad Pitt and Sandra Bullock is due out this summer (see https://www.imdb.com/title/tt12593682/).

For an escapist and entertaining crime read, this is a good choice.

Review by Bethan

March 14, 2022

New signed copies in!

by Team Riverside
book cover Your Story Matters

Margaret Atwood – Burning Questions

Lucy Caldwell – These Days

Marlon James – Moon Witch Spider King

Charlotte Mendelson – The Exhibitionist

Graham Robb – France: an Adventure History

Julia Samuel – Every Family Has a Story

Nikesh Shukla – Your Story Matters

March 13, 2022

Cold Enough For Snow by Jessica Au

by Team Riverside

Fitzcarraldo Editions, £9.99 paperback, out now

Cold Enough for Snow is a startling and subtle mediation on family and belonging from the winner of the inaugural Fitzcarraldo Novel Prize. It is incredibly vivid and sensuous but it is also a gentle read, Au takes us movingly through different scenes, unhurried by plot. At times it’s reminiscent of a series of anecdotes, scenes from the life of the narrator and the narrator’s family are strung together through the conversations between mother and daughter as they wander through Tokyo, eating dinner, visiting tourist attractions. The prose radiates quiet beauty, every detail from the weather to the food that they eat is realised in precise detail. I highly recommend this novel for fans of Rachel Cusk and Sheila Heti.

Review by Phoebe

March 11, 2022

Bestsellers 4th – 11th March

by Team Riverside

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Margaret Atwood – Burning Questions

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Patrick Radden Keefe – Empire of Pain

Natasha Lunn – Conversations on Love

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Frank Tallis – The Act of Living

Georgia Pritchett – My Mess is a Bit of a Life

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Adam Rutherford – Control

Michelle Zauner – Crying in H Mart

Victoria Mas – The Mad Woman’s Ball

Coco Mellors – Cleopatra and Frankenstein

March 4, 2022

Bestsellers 25th February – 3rd March

by Team Riverside

Tim Marshall – The Power of Geography

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Frank Tallis – The Act of Living

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Maggie O’Farrell – Hamnet

Patrick Radden Keefe – Empire of Pain

Karen McManus – One Of Us is Lying

David Baddiel – Jews Don’t Count

Gertrude Stein – Food

bell hooks – All About Love

John Preston – Fall

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

Natasha Lunn – Conversations On Love

Marian Keyes – Rachel’s Holiday

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

February 25, 2022

Bestsellers 18th February – 25th February

by Team Riverside

Natasha Lunn – Conversations On Love

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

F. Scott Fitzgerald – The Great Gatsby

John Preston – Fall

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

Marian Keyes – Again, Rachel

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Hanya Yanigahara – A Little Life

Cho Nam-Joo – Kim Jiyoung, Born 1982

Marion Billet – Busy London

Adam Kay – This Is Going To Hurt

February 17, 2022

Bestsellers 10th – 17th February

by Team Riverside

Frank Herbert – Dune

Tim Marshall – The Power of Geography

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Stanley Tucci – Taste

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

They – Kay Dick

Delia Owens – Where The Crawdads Sing

Hafsa Zayyan – We Are All Birds of Uganda

Mariana Enriquez – The Dangers of Smoking in Bed

Lorraine Mariner eds. – Ten Poems About Love

Bella Mackie – How To Kill Your Family

James Baldwin – Giovanni’s Room

Gertrude Stein – Food

Anna Malaika Tubbs – Three Mothers

Luke Kennard – The Answer To Everything

February 13, 2022

Happy Hour by Marlowe Granados

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Verso £10.99 Out Now

Isa and her best friend Gala arrive in New York in the Summer of 2013 with a mission in mind, to have as much fun as possible. They recall the heroines of golden age Hollywood; in another era they could be Jane Russell and Marilyn Monroe in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. Isa and Gala’s literary ancestors might have treated this scene as a marriage market, but the novel is free of commitment, although not without romantic entanglements and their consequences. Isa and Gala’s friendship is the most important relationship in the novel, their friendship is loving but not idyllic, Isa more than once refers to it as a ‘marriage’ with all the history and tensions that go along with that description. Clothes are a secondary, yet crucially important romance, work is something to be avoided where possible and ambition a laughable fancy.

Happy Hour dispels the myth that glamour is analogous to wealth, Isa and Gala are permanently down on their luck, scraping a living by selling clothes on a vintage stall and taking ad hoc modelling and babysitting jobs. In spite of this, they manage to mainly have a fabulous time, only an uncomfortable jaunt to the Hamptons is enough to show Isa that the fair might be coming to an end.

Granados turns sharp and witty prose to great affect here. I would highly recommend Happy Hour for anyone seeking an intelligent but fun read in the mode of Anita Loos, Dorothy Parker or Nora Ephron.

Review by Phoebe

February 13, 2022

Bestsellers 6th – 13th February

by Team Riverside

Tim Marshall – The Power of Geography

Patricia Lockwood – No One Is Talking About This

Hafsa Zayyan – We Are All Birds of Uganda

Natasha Lunn – Conversations on Love

Virginia Woolf – Flush

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

Stanley Tucci – Taste

Frank Herbert – Dune

Sally Rooney – Conversations With Friends

Abdulrazak Gurnah – Afterlives

Mo Willems – Don’t Let The Pigeon Drive The Bus

Lorraine Mariner – Ten Poems on Love

Anna Malaika Tubbs – Three Mothers

Karen McManus – One of Us Is Lying

Peppa Pig – Peppa’s Magical Unicorn

February 5, 2022

Bestsellers 29th January – 5th February

by Team Riverside

Natasha Lunn – Conversations on Love

Frank Tallis – The Act of Living

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

Tim Marshall – The Power of Geography

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Maurice Sendak – Where The Wild Things Are

Charles Dickens – The Great Winglebury Duel

John Preston – Fall

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Claire Fuller – Unsettled Ground

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Francis Spufford – Light Perpetual

Tom Chivers – London Clay

January 21, 2022

Bestsellers 14th – 21st January

by Team Riverside

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

John Preston – Fall

Hanya Yanagihara – To Paradise

Stephen Millar – Londons Hidden Walks

Sasha Dugdale – Ten Poems About Walking

Stanley Tucci – Taste

Frank Tallis – The Act of Living

Nan Shepherd – The Living Mountain

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Khaled Hosseini – A Thousand Splendid Suns

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Donna Tartt – The Secret History

Joan Aiken – Arabel and Mortimer Stories

Claire Fuller – Unsettled Ground

Kazuo Ishiguro – Never Let Me Go

January 14, 2022

Bestsellers 7th – 14th January

by Team Riverside

Hanya Yanagihara – To Paradise

John Preston – Fall

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Claire Fuller – Unsettled Ground

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Lucy Caldwell – Intimacies

Claire Keegan – Small Things Like These

Nan Shepherd – The Living Mountain

Maggie O’Farrell – Hamnet

Douglas Stuart – Shuggie Bain

Raven Leilani – Luster

Matt Haig – The Midnight Library

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Wendy Kendall – My Little Garden

January 10, 2022

Change Sings: a Children’s Anthem by Amanda Gorman and Loren Long

by Team Riverside
Change Sings book cover

Hardback, Penguin Books, £12.99, out now

Change Sings is a positive and inspiring picture book, showing how children can make a difference in their home area and beyond.

“I’m a chant that rises and rings.  There is hope when my change sings”.  Amanda Gorman is an activist and poet probably best known the UK for the poem she wrote for Joe Biden’s inauguration, The Hill We Climb (read it here, https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/jan/20/amanda-gorman-poem-biden-inauguration-transcript).  She was 22 when she delivered it.

Loren Long illustrated Barack Obama’s children’s book Of Thee I sing, and her work in Change Sings is similarly uplifting and lively.

It’s helpful to have a children’s book that shows that working for change can be cheerful, friendly, and fun, even when serious things are at stake.

The combination of Amanda Gorman’s poem (perfect for reading aloud) and Loren Long’s vibrant and engaging illustrations makes the book a source of joy in difficult times.  I feel like Desmond Tutu would have approved (I’ve been rereading The Book of Joy following his death and it’s as useful as ever).  For anyone needing more instant uplift, some images of the Archibishop Emeritus might help (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-59793545).  Change Sings is a pleasure to share.

Review by Bethan

January 8, 2022

Bestsellers 1st – 8th January

by Team Riverside

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

John Le Carre – Silverview

Frank Herbert – Dune

Qian Julie Wang – Beautiful Country

Marit Kapla – Osebol

Bernadine Evaristo – Manifesto

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Marion Billett – Busy London

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Katherine Mansfield – Prelude & Other Stories

Tim Marshall – The Power of Geography

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Isabel Waidner – Sterling Karat Gold

January 3, 2022

The Bloodless Boy by Robert J Lloyd

by Team Riverside
book cover of The Bloodless Boy

Hardback, Melville House Publishing, £18.99, out now

Snow falls as the scientist Robert Hooke and his former assistant Harry Hunt are called to a child’s body which has been found on the Fleet riverbank.  The body has been drained of blood.  The city of London in 1678 is febrile with anti-Catholic feeling and the shadows of the recent civil war are all around.

This is an excellent historical mystery, and much of the action takes place around where the Riverside Bookshop now is.  London Bridge, Southwark, the Monument, Bishopsgate, Westminster… for anyone who knows this area well, The Bloodless Boy will take you through areas at once familiar and strange.  In Whitechapel market, “Black powder from hundreds of chimneys and from the fires, braziers and stoves set up to keep the traders warm, dusted the hard, refrozen snow”.

It is like C J Sansom’s Shardlake series, combining a compelling mystery with detailed research that’s lightly worn, and featuring some real-life characters (in this case John Locke and King Charles II as well as Hooke). 

It is clear that Lloyd has expertise in the history of science and the history of ideas.  I knew I was going to enjoy the book when it opened with a cast list of characters including a fanatic, an assassin, and one who is both “a clergyman, and perjurer”.

Originally published in 2013 and reprinted now in a gorgeous hardback edition, The Bloodless Boy has won praise quotes from Lee Child, Andrew Taylor and Christopher Fowler among others.

A great London book and a gripping and pacy story.  Recommended.

Review by Bethan

December 31, 2021

Bestsellers 24th – 31st December

by Team Riverside

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Yotam Ottolenghi and Noor Murad – Ottolenghi Test Kitchen: Shelf Love

Michaela Coel – Misfits

Frank Herbert – Dune

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Kate Ellis eds. – Brick Lane Bookshop Short Story Prize Longlist

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Jessica Harrison eds. – The Penguin Book of Christmas Stories

Sally Rooney – Conversations With Friends

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Maggie Shipstead – Great Circle

Tom Chivers – London Clay

Clare Chambers – Small Pleasures

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

December 18, 2021

Bestsellers 11th – 18th December

by Team Riverside

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Yotam Ottolenghi and Noor Murad – Ottolenghi Test Kitchen: Shelf Love

John Le Carre – Silverview

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Claire Keegan – Small Things Like These

Abdulrazak Gurnah – Afterlives

Hannah J. Parkinson – The Joy of Small Things

Colson Whitehead – Harlem Shuffle

Various Authors – The Haunting Season

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

Michaela Coel – Misfits

Stanley Tucci – Taste

Dave Eggers – The Every

Various Poets – The Liberty Faber Poetry Diary

Amor Towles – The Lincoln Highway

December 14, 2021

Moominland Midwinter (colour edition) by Tove Jansson

by Team Riverside
Moominland Midwinter book cover

Hardback, Sort Of Books, £14.99, out now

This new special edition of Moominland Midwinter is a complete treat.  It has colour plates and a big map, and is beautifully produced (as books from this publisher usually are).  The colour plates were produced by Jansson in 1961 for the Italian version of the book and make their first UK appearance here, sixty years later (you can see some of the gorgeous plates here – https://www.moomin.com/en/blog/moominland-midwinter-color-illustrations/#57813284).

I loved Moominland Midwinter when I came across it in 2017 and reviewed it then – https://riversidebookshop.co.uk/2017/10/15/moominland-midwinter-by-tove-jansson/.

There is also a fantastic picture of grumpy Moomin ancestors on p. 89 which is worth the price of the book alone.

Review by Bethan