Archive for ‘London’

April 18, 2022

Bestsellers 11th April – 18th April

by Team Riverside

Elif Shafak – The Island of The Missing Trees

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Stanley Tucci – Taste

Ali Smith – Companion Piece

Douglas Stuart – Young Mungo

Bella Mackie – How To Kill Your Family

Patrick Radden Keefe – Empire of Pain

Michael Lewis – The Premonition

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Frank Tallis – The Act of Living

Adam Hargreaves – Mr. Men in London

Eliot Higgins – We Are Bellingcat

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Mary Lawson – A Town Solace

April 2, 2022

Bestsellers 26th March – 2nd April

by Team Riverside

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Kae Tempest – On Connection

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Marion Billet – Busy London

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Matthew Green – Shadowlands

Daisy Buchanan – Careering

Tom Chivers – London Clay

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Agatha Christie – Miss Marple and Mystery

Michael Lewis – The Premonition

March 20, 2022

Bestsellers 13th – 20th of March

by Team Riverside

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Catherine Belton – Putin’s People

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Marion Billet – Busy London

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Tom Burgis – Kleptopia

John Preston – Fall

Eliot Higgins – We Are Bellingcat

Charlotte Mendelson – The Exhibitionist

Kotaro Isaka – Bullet Train

Tim Marshal – The Power of Geography

Rebecca F. John – Fannie

David Baddiel – Jews Don’t Count

Siobhan Dowd – The London Eye Mystery

March 13, 2022

Cold Enough For Snow by Jessica Au

by Team Riverside

Fitzcarraldo Editions, £9.99 paperback, out now

Cold Enough for Snow is a startling and subtle mediation on family and belonging from the winner of the inaugural Fitzcarraldo Novel Prize. It is incredibly vivid and sensuous but it is also a gentle read, Au takes us movingly through different scenes, unhurried by plot. At times it’s reminiscent of a series of anecdotes, scenes from the life of the narrator and the narrator’s family are strung together through the conversations between mother and daughter as they wander through Tokyo, eating dinner, visiting tourist attractions. The prose radiates quiet beauty, every detail from the weather to the food that they eat is realised in precise detail. I highly recommend this novel for fans of Rachel Cusk and Sheila Heti.

Review by Phoebe

March 11, 2022

Bestsellers 4th – 11th March

by Team Riverside

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Margaret Atwood – Burning Questions

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Patrick Radden Keefe – Empire of Pain

Natasha Lunn – Conversations on Love

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Frank Tallis – The Act of Living

Georgia Pritchett – My Mess is a Bit of a Life

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Adam Rutherford – Control

Michelle Zauner – Crying in H Mart

Victoria Mas – The Mad Woman’s Ball

Coco Mellors – Cleopatra and Frankenstein

March 4, 2022

Bestsellers 25th February – 3rd March

by Team Riverside

Tim Marshall – The Power of Geography

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Frank Tallis – The Act of Living

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Maggie O’Farrell – Hamnet

Patrick Radden Keefe – Empire of Pain

Karen McManus – One Of Us is Lying

David Baddiel – Jews Don’t Count

Gertrude Stein – Food

bell hooks – All About Love

John Preston – Fall

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

Natasha Lunn – Conversations On Love

Marian Keyes – Rachel’s Holiday

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

February 25, 2022

Bestsellers 18th February – 25th February

by Team Riverside

Natasha Lunn – Conversations On Love

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

F. Scott Fitzgerald – The Great Gatsby

John Preston – Fall

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

Marian Keyes – Again, Rachel

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Hanya Yanigahara – A Little Life

Cho Nam-Joo – Kim Jiyoung, Born 1982

Marion Billet – Busy London

Adam Kay – This Is Going To Hurt

February 13, 2022

Happy Hour by Marlowe Granados

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Verso £10.99 Out Now

Isa and her best friend Gala arrive in New York in the Summer of 2013 with a mission in mind, to have as much fun as possible. They recall the heroines of golden age Hollywood; in another era they could be Jane Russell and Marilyn Monroe in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. Isa and Gala’s literary ancestors might have treated this scene as a marriage market, but the novel is free of commitment, although not without romantic entanglements and their consequences. Isa and Gala’s friendship is the most important relationship in the novel, their friendship is loving but not idyllic, Isa more than once refers to it as a ‘marriage’ with all the history and tensions that go along with that description. Clothes are a secondary, yet crucially important romance, work is something to be avoided where possible and ambition a laughable fancy.

Happy Hour dispels the myth that glamour is analogous to wealth, Isa and Gala are permanently down on their luck, scraping a living by selling clothes on a vintage stall and taking ad hoc modelling and babysitting jobs. In spite of this, they manage to mainly have a fabulous time, only an uncomfortable jaunt to the Hamptons is enough to show Isa that the fair might be coming to an end.

Granados turns sharp and witty prose to great affect here. I would highly recommend Happy Hour for anyone seeking an intelligent but fun read in the mode of Anita Loos, Dorothy Parker or Nora Ephron.

Review by Phoebe

February 5, 2022

Bestsellers 29th January – 5th February

by Team Riverside

Natasha Lunn – Conversations on Love

Frank Tallis – The Act of Living

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

Tim Marshall – The Power of Geography

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Maurice Sendak – Where The Wild Things Are

Charles Dickens – The Great Winglebury Duel

John Preston – Fall

Caleb Azumah Nelson – Open Water

Claire Fuller – Unsettled Ground

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Francis Spufford – Light Perpetual

Tom Chivers – London Clay

February 1, 2022

London’s Hidden Walks volume 4 by Stephen Millar

by Team Riverside
cover of London's Hidden Walks vol 4

Paperback, Metro, £11.99, Publisher

The pocket-sized London’s Hidden Walks series is well researched and handy.  The latest addition, subtitled Every Street Has a Story to Tell, is a genial and inspiring guide to some hidden London treasures.

Who knew that the Spanish Civil War memorial was right next to Fulham Palace?  Or that the cabman’s shelter in Pimlico, a small green wooden hut serving refreshments, is one of the sole survivors of more than sixty such?  History, architecture, art, literature and generally bizarre things all feature.

South London is especially well represented here, with Clapham, Peckham and Tooting all featuring.  Even in areas I know very well, I’ve learnt to look for some surviving gems because of this book.

Nicely illustrated with quirky photos and useful maps, this is a pleasure to read before you set out, as well as providing suggestions for good restaurants, pubs, and shops on the routes.  The inclusion of notable ghost signs is especially welcome (I used to like the Barlow and Roberts ghost sign on Southwark Street near here, but it seems to be gone now – https://ghostsigns.co.uk/2021/10/barlow-roberts/). This book encourages us to look up: there is often something interesting up there.

Review by Bethan

January 21, 2022

Bestsellers 14th – 21st January

by Team Riverside

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

John Preston – Fall

Hanya Yanagihara – To Paradise

Stephen Millar – Londons Hidden Walks

Sasha Dugdale – Ten Poems About Walking

Stanley Tucci – Taste

Frank Tallis – The Act of Living

Nan Shepherd – The Living Mountain

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Khaled Hosseini – A Thousand Splendid Suns

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Donna Tartt – The Secret History

Joan Aiken – Arabel and Mortimer Stories

Claire Fuller – Unsettled Ground

Kazuo Ishiguro – Never Let Me Go

January 14, 2022

Bestsellers 7th – 14th January

by Team Riverside

Hanya Yanagihara – To Paradise

John Preston – Fall

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Claire Fuller – Unsettled Ground

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Lucy Caldwell – Intimacies

Claire Keegan – Small Things Like These

Nan Shepherd – The Living Mountain

Maggie O’Farrell – Hamnet

Douglas Stuart – Shuggie Bain

Raven Leilani – Luster

Matt Haig – The Midnight Library

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Wendy Kendall – My Little Garden

January 8, 2022

Bestsellers 1st – 8th January

by Team Riverside

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

John Le Carre – Silverview

Frank Herbert – Dune

Qian Julie Wang – Beautiful Country

Marit Kapla – Osebol

Bernadine Evaristo – Manifesto

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Marion Billett – Busy London

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Katherine Mansfield – Prelude & Other Stories

Tim Marshall – The Power of Geography

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Isabel Waidner – Sterling Karat Gold

January 4, 2022

London Shop Fronts by Emma J Page and Rachael Smith

by Team Riverside
London Shop Fronts book cover

Hardback, Hoxton Mini Press, £22.95, out now

Did you know that Fortnum and Mason’s was started by one of Queen Anne’s footmen, who had a side business flogging off used candle wax from the queen’s household?  Or that the wooden flooring in Liberty’s department store is from a nineteenth century warship?  These are the kind of excellent nuggets that feature alongside engaging photos in this beautiful coffee table book (see some of the photos here https://www.hoxtonminipress.com/products/pre-order-london-shopfronts).

I was delighted to see good representation of bookshops (shout out to colleagues at Marchpane and John Sandoe) alongside famous London shops such as the old-school art emporium L Cornelisson and the legendary Beigel Bake on Brick Lane.  Many of the entries include an update on how the businesses have managed during the pandemic, reminding us that some are small independent and/or family companies.  SE1 is well represented too, with the famous M Manze pie and mash shop and Terry’s Cafe.

Some of those working in the shops tell us why they love it, including Guido Gessaroli of the Coffee Run in the Seven Sisters Road: “This is the London I came here for… Diverse, multicultural, a friendly neighbourhood.  The area is sometimes considered a bit shabby, but to me it feels real and down to earth”.

Most places included were new to me, and this book made me want to eat and shop my way around London purely to visit them.  I’d love it if the next edition had a map of sites so that you could arrange walking tours between the places. 

The shop fronts and interiors that have been preserved are especially valuable, and are my favourite things in the book.  New designs that are clearly intended to lift the hearts of anyone even walking down the street are delightful too (Saint Aymes and Mira Mikati, I mean you).  Plot your London days out now, and use this jolly book to do it.

Review by Bethan

January 3, 2022

The Bloodless Boy by Robert J Lloyd

by Team Riverside
book cover of The Bloodless Boy

Hardback, Melville House Publishing, £18.99, out now

Snow falls as the scientist Robert Hooke and his former assistant Harry Hunt are called to a child’s body which has been found on the Fleet riverbank.  The body has been drained of blood.  The city of London in 1678 is febrile with anti-Catholic feeling and the shadows of the recent civil war are all around.

This is an excellent historical mystery, and much of the action takes place around where the Riverside Bookshop now is.  London Bridge, Southwark, the Monument, Bishopsgate, Westminster… for anyone who knows this area well, The Bloodless Boy will take you through areas at once familiar and strange.  In Whitechapel market, “Black powder from hundreds of chimneys and from the fires, braziers and stoves set up to keep the traders warm, dusted the hard, refrozen snow”.

It is like C J Sansom’s Shardlake series, combining a compelling mystery with detailed research that’s lightly worn, and featuring some real-life characters (in this case John Locke and King Charles II as well as Hooke). 

It is clear that Lloyd has expertise in the history of science and the history of ideas.  I knew I was going to enjoy the book when it opened with a cast list of characters including a fanatic, an assassin, and one who is both “a clergyman, and perjurer”.

Originally published in 2013 and reprinted now in a gorgeous hardback edition, The Bloodless Boy has won praise quotes from Lee Child, Andrew Taylor and Christopher Fowler among others.

A great London book and a gripping and pacy story.  Recommended.

Review by Bethan

December 31, 2021

Bestsellers 24th – 31st December

by Team Riverside

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Yotam Ottolenghi and Noor Murad – Ottolenghi Test Kitchen: Shelf Love

Michaela Coel – Misfits

Frank Herbert – Dune

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Kate Ellis eds. – Brick Lane Bookshop Short Story Prize Longlist

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Jessica Harrison eds. – The Penguin Book of Christmas Stories

Sally Rooney – Conversations With Friends

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Maggie Shipstead – Great Circle

Tom Chivers – London Clay

Clare Chambers – Small Pleasures

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

December 11, 2021

Bestsellers 4th – 11th December

by Team Riverside

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Frank Herbert – Dune

Hannah Jane Parkinson – The Joy of Small Things

Stanley Tucci – Taste

Michaela Coel – Misfits

John Banville – Snow

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Marion Billet – Busy London

Marion Billet – Busy London at Christmas

December 8, 2021

London in the Snow by Hoxton Mini Press

by Team Riverside
cover of London in the Snow book

Hardback, Hoxton Mini Press, £16.95, out now

London in the Snow is not only about the humans.  There are elephants with shovels, camels looking a bit chilly, and pigeons making the best of it. 

This charming small hardback photo book has a good range of black and white images from the 1900s to the 1960s, and they are not just the usual subjects (for a sample of the images, see (https://www.hoxtonminipress.com/products/london-in-the-snow-book-10-vintage-britain). There are parks and zoos, synagogues and cathedrals, streets and schools, canals and the river.  I like that there are diverse images from a diverse city.  My favourite photo is a young Sikh man in 1900 tobogganing with the intensity of a champion.  This is a well edited and entertaining selection.

Snow is unusual enough in London that Londoners still react in a variety of ways when it falls.  We might run wild in the park or steer clear of a deserted Oxford Street.  We might valiantly keep working in freezing conditions, or skate across a frozen pond to usher swans towards open water like a woman in this book (perhaps).

We love the Opinionated Guide series from this independent press (see https://riversidebookshop.co.uk/2021/07/12/london-green-spaces-by-harry-ades/).  This latest book in the Vintage Britain series is as beautifully made as its predecessors, and would make a cheerful gift.

Review by Bethan

December 5, 2021

Bestsellers 28th November-5th December

by Team Riverside

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Frank Herbert – Dune

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

eds. Jessica Harrison – The Penguin Book of Christmas Stories

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Sosuke Natsukawa – The Cat Who Saved Books

Merlin Sheldrake – Entangled Life

Shirley Jackson – The Missing Girl

Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche – Notes on Grief

November 27, 2021

Bestsellers 20th – 27th November

by Team Riverside

Frank Herbert – Dune

Piranesi – Susanna Clarke

Harper Lee – To Kill A Mockingbird

Jessica Harrison eds – The Penguin Book of Christmas Stories

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Sosuke Natsukawa – The Cat Who Saved Books

Sarah Moss – The Fell

Noor Murad, Yotam Ottolenghi – Ottolenghi Test Kitchen: Shelf Love

Elena Ferrante – The Lying Life of Adults

John Le Carre – Silverview

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Merlin Sheldrake – Entangled Life

Amor Towles – The Lincoln Highway

Matt Haig – The Midnight Library

November 21, 2021

Bestsellers 14th November – 21st November

by Team Riverside

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Elizabeth Strout – Oh William!

John Banville – Snow

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Noor Murad and Yotam Ottolenghi – Ottolenghi Test Kitchen: Shelf Love

Harper Lee – To Kill A Mockingbird

Stanley Tucci – Taste: My Life Through Food

John Le Carre – Silverview

Frank Herbert – Dune

Nora Ephron – Heartburn

Rutger Bregman – Humankind: A Hopeful History

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

Charlie Macksey – The Boy, The Mole, The Fox and The Horse

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

November 13, 2021

Bestsellers 6th – 13th November

by Team Riverside

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

Frank Herbert – Dune

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Tom Chivers – London Clay

Florence Given – Women Don’t Owe You Pretty

Stanley Tucci – Taste: My Life Through Food

Sosuke Natsukawa – The Cat Who Saved Books

Tim Marshall – The Power of Geography

Various Authors – A Scandinavian Christmas: Festive Tales For a Nordic Noel

Nigel Slater – A Cook’s Book

George Orwell – 1984

October 30, 2021

Bestsellers 23rd – 30th October

by Team Riverside

Frank Herbert – Dune

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Various Authors – A Scandinavian Christmas: Festive Tales For a Nordic Noel

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

John Preston – Fall: The Mystery of Robert Maxwell

Jonathon Franzen – Crossroads

Lea Ypi – Free: Coming of Age at the End of History

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Sosuke Natsukawa – The Cat Who Saved Books

Rachel Morrisroe, Steven Lenton – How To Grow a Unicorn

Stephanie Garnier – How to Live Like Your Cat

Ralph Ellison – Invisible Man

John Steinbeck – The Vigilante

Shon Faye – The Transgender Issue

October 23, 2021

Bestsellers 16th-23rd October

by Team Riverside

John le Carre – Silverview

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Stanley Tucci – Taste: My Life Through Food

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Elizabeth Strout – Oh William!

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Elena Ferrante – The Lying Life of Adults

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Suzanna Clarke – Piranesi

Rumaan Alam – Leave The World Behind

Yotam Ottolenghi, Noor Murad – Ottolenghi Test Kitchen: Shelf Love

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Florence Given – Women Don’t Owe You Pretty

Shirley Jackson – The Haunting of Hill House

October 9, 2021

Bestsellers 2nd – 9th October

by Team Riverside

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Karina Lickorish Quinn – The Dust Never Settles

Sosuke Natsukawa – The Cat Who Saved Books

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Shon Faye – The Transgender Issue

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Merlin Sheldrake – Entangled Life

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Pat Barker – The Women of Troy

Stanley Tucci – Taste: My Life Through Food

William Boyd – Trio

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Bob Mortimer – And Away…

October 6, 2021

Filthy Animals by Brandon Taylor

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Daunt Books, £9.99, out now

Filthy Animals is the new collection of short stories from Booker Prize shortlisted writer Brandon Taylor, fans of his characteristically vivid prose and razor-sharp observations will not be disappointed by this stunning collection.

Taylor has a gift for portraying social discomfort in excruciating detail and this is perhaps best on display in the first story in the collection ‘Potluck’. Lionel, a character recovering from a suicide attempt becomes caught up in the world of Charles and Sophie, both dancers involved in an open relationship. Their encounters are ambiguous but powerful, affectionate but also distant and strange. In stories such as ‘Mass’ there is often an emphasis on the characters physicality, many of them are training to be professional dancers and there is an acute, Degas-like focus on their muscular bodies as a site for potential greatness and also a possible site of disaster. There is a kind of slipperiness throughout the book, many of the interactions between characters turn rapidly from friendly to hostile and back again. But love is always present, after so much anxiety and fraught relationships, the tenderness of ‘Anne of Cleves’ caught me off guard, it’s a beautifully realised story about a relationship blossoming between two women.

The stunning, cinematic quality of Taylor’s prose never fails, each story has a complete world within it, even when the characters fail to communicate verbally, the atmosphere is palpable. I recommend this book especially for fans of Lucia Berlin.

Review by Phoebe

October 2, 2021

Bestsellers 25th September to 2nd October

by Team Riverside

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Shon Faye – The Transgender Issue

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Tom Chivers – London Clay

Maggie O’Farrell – Hamnet

Suzannah Clarke – Piranesi

Frank Herbert – Dune

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche – Notes on Grief

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Colson Whitehead – Harlem Shuffle

Bob Mortimer – And Away…

Marion Billet – Busy London

September 24, 2021

Bestsellers 17th-24th September

by Team Riverside

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You

Suzannah Clarke – Piranesi

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Frank Herbert – Dune

John Cooper Clarke – I Wanna Be Yours

Monique Roffey – The Mermaid of Black Conch

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Nadifa Mohamed – The Fortune Men

Sally Rooney – Normal People

Eoin McLaughlin – The Hug

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

September 9, 2021

Bestsellers 2nd to the 9th of September

by Team Riverside

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Pat Barker – The Women of Troy

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Emily St. John Mandel – The Glass Hotel

Caitlin Moran – More Than a Woman

Fran Lebowitz – The Fran Lebowitz Reader

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Clare Chambers – Small Pleasures

Charlie Macksey – The Boy, The Mole, The Fox and The Horse

Merlin Sheldrake – Entangled Life

Sebastian Faulks – Snow Country

Elena Ferrante – The Lying Life of Adults

July 12, 2021

London Green Spaces by Harry Adès

by Team Riverside
London Green Spaces

Paperback, Hoxton Mini Press, £9.95, out now

After a year of intermittent lockdowns, when I was lucky enough to have a lively local park near me and to be able to visit it, I am very ready to try out some new London green spots. London Green Spaces is one of a gorgeous new series of small London guidebooks, and this book makes it fun to start a day-out wishlist.  Even looking at the photos cheered me up.

I thought I knew most of the cool parks and green bits in London, but there were several in here I’d never heard of.  London Green Spaces offers an enticing reminder of the big places too, the ones that you know about but haven’t visited for a while, like Richmond Park or Epping Forest.  Useful cover maps and suggested walks would help make a day of it.

The Red Cross Garden in London Bridge features, and I can vouch for its sanctuary-like feel as a respite from the Borough Market crowds at the weekend (https://www.bost.org.uk/).  The book is good on these small places as well as the grand sweeping ones.  I’d add the Crossbones Graveyard, just round the corner from the Red Cross Garden, though you always need to check the opening hours (https://crossbones.org.uk/).

Other craveable titles in the series include Vegan London, London Pubs, and Independent London.  You’re in London (maybe)… it’s summer (sort of)… if you’re able to get out and about these books will help you lively up your plans. 

Review by Bethan