Archive for ‘London’

January 14, 2022

Bestsellers 7th – 14th January

by Team Riverside

Hanya Yanagihara – To Paradise

John Preston – Fall

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Claire Fuller – Unsettled Ground

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Lucy Caldwell – Intimacies

Claire Keegan – Small Things Like These

Nan Shepherd – The Living Mountain

Maggie O’Farrell – Hamnet

Douglas Stuart – Shuggie Bain

Raven Leilani – Luster

Matt Haig – The Midnight Library

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Wendy Kendall – My Little Garden

January 8, 2022

Bestsellers 1st – 8th January

by Team Riverside

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Sathnam Sanghera – Empireland

John Le Carre – Silverview

Frank Herbert – Dune

Qian Julie Wang – Beautiful Country

Marit Kapla – Osebol

Bernadine Evaristo – Manifesto

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Marion Billett – Busy London

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Katherine Mansfield – Prelude & Other Stories

Tim Marshall – The Power of Geography

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Isabel Waidner – Sterling Karat Gold

January 4, 2022

London Shop Fronts by Emma J Page and Rachael Smith

by Team Riverside
London Shop Fronts book cover

Hardback, Hoxton Mini Press, £22.95, out now

Did you know that Fortnum and Mason’s was started by one of Queen Anne’s footmen, who had a side business flogging off used candle wax from the queen’s household?  Or that the wooden flooring in Liberty’s department store is from a nineteenth century warship?  These are the kind of excellent nuggets that feature alongside engaging photos in this beautiful coffee table book (see some of the photos here https://www.hoxtonminipress.com/products/pre-order-london-shopfronts).

I was delighted to see good representation of bookshops (shout out to colleagues at Marchpane and John Sandoe) alongside famous London shops such as the old-school art emporium L Cornelisson and the legendary Beigel Bake on Brick Lane.  Many of the entries include an update on how the businesses have managed during the pandemic, reminding us that some are small independent and/or family companies.  SE1 is well represented too, with the famous M Manze pie and mash shop and Terry’s Cafe.

Some of those working in the shops tell us why they love it, including Guido Gessaroli of the Coffee Run in the Seven Sisters Road: “This is the London I came here for… Diverse, multicultural, a friendly neighbourhood.  The area is sometimes considered a bit shabby, but to me it feels real and down to earth”.

Most places included were new to me, and this book made me want to eat and shop my way around London purely to visit them.  I’d love it if the next edition had a map of sites so that you could arrange walking tours between the places. 

The shop fronts and interiors that have been preserved are especially valuable, and are my favourite things in the book.  New designs that are clearly intended to lift the hearts of anyone even walking down the street are delightful too (Saint Aymes and Mira Mikati, I mean you).  Plot your London days out now, and use this jolly book to do it.

Review by Bethan

January 3, 2022

The Bloodless Boy by Robert J Lloyd

by Team Riverside
book cover of The Bloodless Boy

Hardback, Melville House Publishing, £18.99, out now

Snow falls as the scientist Robert Hooke and his former assistant Harry Hunt are called to a child’s body which has been found on the Fleet riverbank.  The body has been drained of blood.  The city of London in 1678 is febrile with anti-Catholic feeling and the shadows of the recent civil war are all around.

This is an excellent historical mystery, and much of the action takes place around where the Riverside Bookshop now is.  London Bridge, Southwark, the Monument, Bishopsgate, Westminster… for anyone who knows this area well, The Bloodless Boy will take you through areas at once familiar and strange.  In Whitechapel market, “Black powder from hundreds of chimneys and from the fires, braziers and stoves set up to keep the traders warm, dusted the hard, refrozen snow”.

It is like C J Sansom’s Shardlake series, combining a compelling mystery with detailed research that’s lightly worn, and featuring some real-life characters (in this case John Locke and King Charles II as well as Hooke). 

It is clear that Lloyd has expertise in the history of science and the history of ideas.  I knew I was going to enjoy the book when it opened with a cast list of characters including a fanatic, an assassin, and one who is both “a clergyman, and perjurer”.

Originally published in 2013 and reprinted now in a gorgeous hardback edition, The Bloodless Boy has won praise quotes from Lee Child, Andrew Taylor and Christopher Fowler among others.

A great London book and a gripping and pacy story.  Recommended.

Review by Bethan

December 31, 2021

Bestsellers 24th – 31st December

by Team Riverside

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Yotam Ottolenghi and Noor Murad – Ottolenghi Test Kitchen: Shelf Love

Michaela Coel – Misfits

Frank Herbert – Dune

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Kate Ellis eds. – Brick Lane Bookshop Short Story Prize Longlist

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Jessica Harrison eds. – The Penguin Book of Christmas Stories

Sally Rooney – Conversations With Friends

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Maggie Shipstead – Great Circle

Tom Chivers – London Clay

Clare Chambers – Small Pleasures

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

December 11, 2021

Bestsellers 4th – 11th December

by Team Riverside

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Frank Herbert – Dune

Hannah Jane Parkinson – The Joy of Small Things

Stanley Tucci – Taste

Michaela Coel – Misfits

John Banville – Snow

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Marion Billet – Busy London

Marion Billet – Busy London at Christmas

December 8, 2021

London in the Snow by Hoxton Mini Press

by Team Riverside
cover of London in the Snow book

Hardback, Hoxton Mini Press, £16.95, out now

London in the Snow is not only about the humans.  There are elephants with shovels, camels looking a bit chilly, and pigeons making the best of it. 

This charming small hardback photo book has a good range of black and white images from the 1900s to the 1960s, and they are not just the usual subjects (for a sample of the images, see (https://www.hoxtonminipress.com/products/london-in-the-snow-book-10-vintage-britain). There are parks and zoos, synagogues and cathedrals, streets and schools, canals and the river.  I like that there are diverse images from a diverse city.  My favourite photo is a young Sikh man in 1900 tobogganing with the intensity of a champion.  This is a well edited and entertaining selection.

Snow is unusual enough in London that Londoners still react in a variety of ways when it falls.  We might run wild in the park or steer clear of a deserted Oxford Street.  We might valiantly keep working in freezing conditions, or skate across a frozen pond to usher swans towards open water like a woman in this book (perhaps).

We love the Opinionated Guide series from this independent press (see https://riversidebookshop.co.uk/2021/07/12/london-green-spaces-by-harry-ades/).  This latest book in the Vintage Britain series is as beautifully made as its predecessors, and would make a cheerful gift.

Review by Bethan

December 5, 2021

Bestsellers 28th November-5th December

by Team Riverside

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Frank Herbert – Dune

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

eds. Jessica Harrison – The Penguin Book of Christmas Stories

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Sosuke Natsukawa – The Cat Who Saved Books

Merlin Sheldrake – Entangled Life

Shirley Jackson – The Missing Girl

Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche – Notes on Grief

November 27, 2021

Bestsellers 20th – 27th November

by Team Riverside

Frank Herbert – Dune

Piranesi – Susanna Clarke

Harper Lee – To Kill A Mockingbird

Jessica Harrison eds – The Penguin Book of Christmas Stories

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Sosuke Natsukawa – The Cat Who Saved Books

Sarah Moss – The Fell

Noor Murad, Yotam Ottolenghi – Ottolenghi Test Kitchen: Shelf Love

Elena Ferrante – The Lying Life of Adults

John Le Carre – Silverview

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Merlin Sheldrake – Entangled Life

Amor Towles – The Lincoln Highway

Matt Haig – The Midnight Library

November 21, 2021

Bestsellers 14th November – 21st November

by Team Riverside

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Elizabeth Strout – Oh William!

John Banville – Snow

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Noor Murad and Yotam Ottolenghi – Ottolenghi Test Kitchen: Shelf Love

Harper Lee – To Kill A Mockingbird

Stanley Tucci – Taste: My Life Through Food

John Le Carre – Silverview

Frank Herbert – Dune

Nora Ephron – Heartburn

Rutger Bregman – Humankind: A Hopeful History

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

Charlie Macksey – The Boy, The Mole, The Fox and The Horse

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

November 13, 2021

Bestsellers 6th – 13th November

by Team Riverside

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

Frank Herbert – Dune

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Tom Chivers – London Clay

Florence Given – Women Don’t Owe You Pretty

Stanley Tucci – Taste: My Life Through Food

Sosuke Natsukawa – The Cat Who Saved Books

Tim Marshall – The Power of Geography

Various Authors – A Scandinavian Christmas: Festive Tales For a Nordic Noel

Nigel Slater – A Cook’s Book

George Orwell – 1984

October 30, 2021

Bestsellers 23rd – 30th October

by Team Riverside

Frank Herbert – Dune

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Various Authors – A Scandinavian Christmas: Festive Tales For a Nordic Noel

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

John Preston – Fall: The Mystery of Robert Maxwell

Jonathon Franzen – Crossroads

Lea Ypi – Free: Coming of Age at the End of History

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Sosuke Natsukawa – The Cat Who Saved Books

Rachel Morrisroe, Steven Lenton – How To Grow a Unicorn

Stephanie Garnier – How to Live Like Your Cat

Ralph Ellison – Invisible Man

John Steinbeck – The Vigilante

Shon Faye – The Transgender Issue

October 23, 2021

Bestsellers 16th-23rd October

by Team Riverside

John le Carre – Silverview

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Stanley Tucci – Taste: My Life Through Food

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Elizabeth Strout – Oh William!

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Elena Ferrante – The Lying Life of Adults

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Suzanna Clarke – Piranesi

Rumaan Alam – Leave The World Behind

Yotam Ottolenghi, Noor Murad – Ottolenghi Test Kitchen: Shelf Love

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Florence Given – Women Don’t Owe You Pretty

Shirley Jackson – The Haunting of Hill House

October 9, 2021

Bestsellers 2nd – 9th October

by Team Riverside

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Karina Lickorish Quinn – The Dust Never Settles

Sosuke Natsukawa – The Cat Who Saved Books

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Shon Faye – The Transgender Issue

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Merlin Sheldrake – Entangled Life

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Pat Barker – The Women of Troy

Stanley Tucci – Taste: My Life Through Food

William Boyd – Trio

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Bob Mortimer – And Away…

October 6, 2021

Filthy Animals by Brandon Taylor

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Daunt Books, £9.99, out now

Filthy Animals is the new collection of short stories from Booker Prize shortlisted writer Brandon Taylor, fans of his characteristically vivid prose and razor-sharp observations will not be disappointed by this stunning collection.

Taylor has a gift for portraying social discomfort in excruciating detail and this is perhaps best on display in the first story in the collection ‘Potluck’. Lionel, a character recovering from a suicide attempt becomes caught up in the world of Charles and Sophie, both dancers involved in an open relationship. Their encounters are ambiguous but powerful, affectionate but also distant and strange. In stories such as ‘Mass’ there is often an emphasis on the characters physicality, many of them are training to be professional dancers and there is an acute, Degas-like focus on their muscular bodies as a site for potential greatness and also a possible site of disaster. There is a kind of slipperiness throughout the book, many of the interactions between characters turn rapidly from friendly to hostile and back again. But love is always present, after so much anxiety and fraught relationships, the tenderness of ‘Anne of Cleves’ caught me off guard, it’s a beautifully realised story about a relationship blossoming between two women.

The stunning, cinematic quality of Taylor’s prose never fails, each story has a complete world within it, even when the characters fail to communicate verbally, the atmosphere is palpable. I recommend this book especially for fans of Lucia Berlin.

Review by Phoebe

October 2, 2021

Bestsellers 25th September to 2nd October

by Team Riverside

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Shon Faye – The Transgender Issue

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Tom Chivers – London Clay

Maggie O’Farrell – Hamnet

Suzannah Clarke – Piranesi

Frank Herbert – Dune

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche – Notes on Grief

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Colson Whitehead – Harlem Shuffle

Bob Mortimer – And Away…

Marion Billet – Busy London

September 24, 2021

Bestsellers 17th-24th September

by Team Riverside

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You

Suzannah Clarke – Piranesi

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Frank Herbert – Dune

John Cooper Clarke – I Wanna Be Yours

Monique Roffey – The Mermaid of Black Conch

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Nadifa Mohamed – The Fortune Men

Sally Rooney – Normal People

Eoin McLaughlin – The Hug

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

September 9, 2021

Bestsellers 2nd to the 9th of September

by Team Riverside

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Pat Barker – The Women of Troy

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Emily St. John Mandel – The Glass Hotel

Caitlin Moran – More Than a Woman

Fran Lebowitz – The Fran Lebowitz Reader

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Clare Chambers – Small Pleasures

Charlie Macksey – The Boy, The Mole, The Fox and The Horse

Merlin Sheldrake – Entangled Life

Sebastian Faulks – Snow Country

Elena Ferrante – The Lying Life of Adults

July 12, 2021

London Green Spaces by Harry Adès

by Team Riverside
London Green Spaces

Paperback, Hoxton Mini Press, £9.95, out now

After a year of intermittent lockdowns, when I was lucky enough to have a lively local park near me and to be able to visit it, I am very ready to try out some new London green spots. London Green Spaces is one of a gorgeous new series of small London guidebooks, and this book makes it fun to start a day-out wishlist.  Even looking at the photos cheered me up.

I thought I knew most of the cool parks and green bits in London, but there were several in here I’d never heard of.  London Green Spaces offers an enticing reminder of the big places too, the ones that you know about but haven’t visited for a while, like Richmond Park or Epping Forest.  Useful cover maps and suggested walks would help make a day of it.

The Red Cross Garden in London Bridge features, and I can vouch for its sanctuary-like feel as a respite from the Borough Market crowds at the weekend (https://www.bost.org.uk/).  The book is good on these small places as well as the grand sweeping ones.  I’d add the Crossbones Graveyard, just round the corner from the Red Cross Garden, though you always need to check the opening hours (https://crossbones.org.uk/).

Other craveable titles in the series include Vegan London, London Pubs, and Independent London.  You’re in London (maybe)… it’s summer (sort of)… if you’re able to get out and about these books will help you lively up your plans. 

Review by Bethan

June 21, 2021

Assembly by Natasha Brown

by Team Riverside

Hamish Hamilton, Hardback, £12.99, out now

Assembly by Natasha Brown is more than deserving of the glowing reviews it has already received. It’s a slight volume, the plot unfolds over a series of fleeting but intense vignettes and each is crafted to perfection, not a single word is wasted. At times it feels reminiscent of prose poetry or maybe a sparse drama. The narrator is quiet and controlled but burns with quiet anger, acutely aware of the injustices that plague her. She is a black British woman who has found significant success in the corporate world but seemingly at significant psychological and physical cost to herself. She is often a vessel for other characters racist hang-ups, one colleague vents to her about his hatred of diversity initiatives, another calls her office phone to tell her her hair is ‘wild’ and her skin is ‘exotic’. She has a jovial posh boyfriend, who like her attended Oxford and the action unfolds as she anticipates attending his parents lavish anniversary party.

Recently a reviewer compared Assembly to Mrs. Dalloway, but I thought of Brandon Taylor whose novel Real Life has similarly exquisite prose and a protagonist who is out of place in their surroundings and also of The Great Gatsby, although while Natasha Brown’s protagonist is, like Nick Carraway, among the rich and powerful, she is not impressed. When I got to the last page I was sorry to finish Assembly I thoroughly recommend it.

Review by Phoebe

May 16, 2021

Detransition, Baby by Torrey Peters

by Team Riverside

Serpents Tail, Hardback, £14.99 out now

Detransition, Baby the first full-length novel from Torrey Peters is a chaotic and heartfelt whirlwind that asks what it means to be a woman and what it means to be a mother. Katrina, a recent divorcee has discovered she is pregnant, her boyfriend and employee, Ames, formerly Amy, hasn’t told her about his past where he lived as a transgender woman but wants to involve his ex-girlfriend Reese, also a transgender woman, in the mothering of their unborn child. Their lives become intertwined in a kind of queer soap opera, can Reese and Ames resolve their past? Can Katrina co-parent with Ames and Reese? Will Reese get to be mother like she has always wanted?

The novel is rigorously plotted, Reese and Amy’s past relationship is seamlessly interspersed with Katrina and Ames relationship in the present, Reese’s history also forms part of the narrative. Torrey Peters demonstrates enormous narrative skill, her digressions on subjects that range from juvenile elephants to Reese’s large cast of friends never feel tangential to the story. The novel feels epic and complex and funny, like a sort of queer Tristram Shandy, and I thoroughly enjoyed every page.

Review by Phoebe

April 19, 2021

Real Life by Brandon Taylor

by Team Riverside

Daunt Books, Paperback, £9.99 out now

Real Life, the debut, Booker Prize shortlisted novel from American writer Brandon Taylor is a triumph. Real Life is a campus novel which follows Wallace, a gay black protagonist as he navigates the academic institution, a burgeoning romance and the fallout of childhood trauma. The novel takes place in a Midwestern university where Wallace is often singled out. Taylor’s depiction of racism on campus is uncompromising, a dinner party scene, in particular, reaches a striking and uncomfortable crescendo.

While reading this novel I was struck, not just by the story, by Taylor’s immense technical skill. Taylor’s prose is unparalleled, spare and focused, yet at times dreamlike, reminiscent of Virginia Woolf or Henry James. A section where the book moves, cinematically, from the protagonists present to his childhood in Alabama, took my breath away. I highly recommend this book to fans of James Baldwin and Donna Tartt, and I will be eagerly awaiting Brandon Taylor’s collection of short stories, published in June.

Review by Phoebe

December 7, 2020

The Stubborn Light of Things: a Nature Diary by Melissa Harrison

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Faber and Faber, £14.99, out now

cover of The Stubborn Light of Things

A kingfisher sat on a riverside branch, so close that I could see blackblue feathers in the early morning light.  I was in a London park, near where I live, last weekend.  I was alone, with no special equipment or expertise, but I was paying attention to the river.  The kingfisher hunched, and tidied itself up, and after a few minutes flew off when a runner came along.

If you have found yourself noticing nature more during this year, this book of essays by Melissa Harrison is for you.  Compiled from her columns in the Times, in the early pieces Harrison is living in South London and gives great descriptions of the nature and wildlife of Tooting Bec Common.  Who knew you could see a hobby flying over Lambeth?  “There are pockets of South London that seem utterly rural: paths edged with cow parsley and dog roses and overhung by oaks through which the sunlight filters down, green-dappled and shifting” (p. 44).

Half way through the book, Harrison relocates to rural Suffolk, and a different kind of natural life.  “There are baby rabbits everywhere right now, and sitting in my oak I watched an alert doe shepherd four kits out from the warren by the path to feed…  The evening sun picks them out as they play, gold-edged and painterly: humble but quite lovely in the low, warm light” (p. 174).  One of the things I love about The Stubborn Light of Things is that Harrison doesn’t say that it is easier or better to be a nature watcher in one place or the other.  Her curious gaze finds things to wonder at in both places, a reminder that we only ever need to start where we are.

As readers of her gripping novels At Hawthorn Time and All Among the Barley will know, she is not afraid of addressing difficult things, and here she references the climate emergency and local campaigns to protect wildlife (for a review of one of her novels, see https://riversidebookshop.co.uk/2015/05/24/at-hawthorn-time-melissa-harrison/).

After reading this, I found similar ideas in On Looking by Alexandra Horowitz (which I am half way through).  Horowitz walks round her Manhattan city block with several different people who are expert at different things, and finds out how little we notice in the normal run of things (one of the people is expert at being a toddler and another is expert at being a dog – see https://www.brainpickings.org/2013/08/12/on-looking-eleven-walks-with-expert-eyes/). 

Harrison’s popular lockdown podcast encouraged us to pay attention, and this book helps us do just that.  Joanna Lisowiec’s exquisite illustrations and gorgeous cover art elevate a good read into a beautiful item.

Review by Bethan

November 3, 2020

An update from us 03/11/2020

by Team Riverside

Dear loyal customers of Riverside Bookshop,

unfortunately, in line with government guidelines, we will be closed from Thursday the 5th of November until further notice. If you wish to order from us in the meantime we can be found via our profile on bookshop.org here: https://uk.bookshop.org/shop/theriversidebookshop

Thank you for your continued support during this difficult time and we hope to be back with you soon!

Love from,

The Team at Riverside Bookshop

October 20, 2020

Earthlings by Sayaka Murata, trans. Ginny Tapeley Takemori

by Team Riverside

Granta, Hardback Fiction, £12.99, out now

A genre-defying novel from the bestselling author of Convenience Store Woman, newly translated into English. Natsuki has spent her whole life not fitting in, failing to live up to the expectations of her family. She confides in her mysterious cousin Yuu and her toy hedgehog, Piyuut, who she believes is an emissary sent by the Magic Police on Planet Popinpobopia. But a tragic event during a family vacation in the wild Nagano Mountains sets Natsuki on a path of alienation, with catastrophic consequences.

Murata’s second novel in English deals with some of the same themes as her first, but while Convenience Store Woman asks how to rebel against familial and domestic structures, Earthlings asks if these structures are necessary at all. The events of the novel are shocking and unpredictable. The structure resembles that of a horror film, Natsuki’s traumatic experiences with a neglectful mother and an abusive teacher drive her deeper and deeper into a fantasy world where she is waiting to be collected by aliens from her home planet. She attempts to escape her family through a loveless marriage, but not even this can save her from their controlling influence. Her behaviour becomes erratic, even sadistic, and culminates in a bloody conclusion, involving her cousin, her husband and a return to the mountains.

Whilst I thought this was a steep departure from Convenience Store Woman, which I thoroughly enjoyed, this second novel in English confirms that Murata is a fantastically exciting writer and I can’t wait to read what she writes next.

Review by Phoebe

October 14, 2020

Smashing London cards in stock!

by Team Riverside
two Art Angels cards

We are delighted to have a bunch of lovely new Art Angels cards in store.  Some offer great views of London, and others focus on the natural world.  We particularly like these two local scenes.

Get them before they are gone!

September 5, 2020

Bestsellers on the Board

by Team Riverside

This week’s bestsellers…

Sophie Ward – Love and Other Thought Experiments

Oyinkan Braithwate – My Sister the Serial Killer

Elena Ferrante – The Lying Life of Adults

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

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September 2, 2020

Blue Ticket by Sophie Mackintosh

by Team Riverside

Hamish Hamilton, Hardback Fiction, £12.99, out now

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An unsettling new vision from the author of The Water Cure. On the day every woman gets their first period they are assigned either a blue or a white ticket, the first signalling that they will not have children, the second indicating that they must. Calla is given a blue ticket, but later in her life she develops an intense, forbidden longing for a child. When she acts on this urge she is thrown into conflict with a mysterious and threatening regime that pushes her onto a journey into exile.

Blue Ticket takes its place in the pantheon of feminist dystopian novels, the women are central to the narrative, their dissent is not just prohibited, it is dangerous. Mackintosh deftly explores the boundaries between natural urges and the systems that constrain them. Although Mackintosh’s prose is heavy with description and poetry, I could see and touch all that she described, Blue Ticket is also surprisingly fast-paced. I found myself holding my breath towards the end, waiting to discover Calla’s fate.

Whilst the questions of the book are weighty, Mackintosh avoids addressing these to the reader directly, Blue Ticket is above all an intensely poetic exploration of freedom, choice and desire.

Review by Phoebe

February 1, 2020

Square Haunting by Francesca Wade

by Team Riverside

Francesca Wade SQUARE HAUNTING

Faber, Hardback, £20.00, out now

Francesca Wade’s Square Haunting is an incredible achievement, informative and detailed yet thrilling and poetic. It is a shared biography of five fascinating women: H.D., a poet, Dorothy L. Sayers, a detective novelist, Jane Ellen Harrison, a classicist and translator, Eileen Power, a historian and broadcaster and Virginia Woolf, a writer and publisher. The book is based around Mecklenburgh Square, a square on the fringes of Bloomsbury where, coincidentally, all of these accomplished women resided at one time or another. This book is not just a history of these women and their work but also of a time where women were starting to live and work independently.

The subject matter itself is fascinating but Wade’s prose is what elevates this beyond the realm of academic biography. The stories of these women’s lives while residing in Mecklenburgh Square are told with astonishing sympathy, I felt a great affinity for these women while reading about their lives, loves, and their striving to have their work recognised.

Wade has rightly gained a great deal of praise for this stunning work of biography; I would recommend it to anyone who has ever wanted A Room of One’s Own.

Review by Phoebe

July 4, 2019

Unladylike Event

by Team Riverside

uNLADYLIKE RIVERSIDE  POSTER2.jpegOur next event will be to celebrate the launch of Unladylike: A Grrl’s Guide to Wrestling by Heather Bandenburg, on 18th July.

Unladylike like follows the story of one unlikely woman wrestler and celebrates the relationship between feminism and wrestling. Read an extract here.

Heather will answer questions and sign your books.

This event is free but we have limited space so get your tickets now.