Archive for ‘Kids books’

December 11, 2021

Bestsellers 4th – 11th December

by Team Riverside

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Frank Herbert – Dune

Hannah Jane Parkinson – The Joy of Small Things

Stanley Tucci – Taste

Michaela Coel – Misfits

John Banville – Snow

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Marion Billet – Busy London

Marion Billet – Busy London at Christmas

December 6, 2021

Michael Rosen’s Sticky McStickstick by Michael Rosen and Tony Ross

by Team Riverside
book cover for Sticky McStickstick

Hardback, Walker Books, £12.99, out now

Early in the pandemic, Michael Rosen got very ill with Covid.  This smashing children’s picture book charts his recovery and the friends who helped him get better.  These include not only the NHS staff, and his supportive family, but also his faithful walking stick, Sticky McStickstick.

Tony Ross’s sensitive and lively illustration is the perfect match for Rosen’s account of his recovery.  From being able to get out of bed, to walking, to going upstairs and making a cup of tea, the recovery is long but each stage is celebrated.  I find it so cheering that Rosen salutes the things that help him move around more: a wheelchair, a walking frame and finally Sticky.  The subtitle says it all: The Friend Who Helped Me Walk Again.  Sticky has a lot of personality.

From the poet who brought you These are the Hands, a song of gratitude to the NHS (see https://www.scottishpoetrylibrary.org.uk/poem/these-are-hands/), it is no surprise that Rosen gives all credit due to the staff who saved his life and then helped him to recover as best he could.  This would be a good book for explaining serious illness and recovery to children, but also for anyone going through it themselves.  Like the best children’s books, this is really for everyone.  He deals well with fear, and also with keeping on trying.  “Maybe you’ve been ill.  Or maybe you know someone who’s been ill.  When we’re ill, we change, don’t we?  And then we do what we can to get better.  People help us.”

Review by Bethan

December 5, 2021

Bestsellers 28th November-5th December

by Team Riverside

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Frank Herbert – Dune

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

eds. Jessica Harrison – The Penguin Book of Christmas Stories

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Sosuke Natsukawa – The Cat Who Saved Books

Merlin Sheldrake – Entangled Life

Shirley Jackson – The Missing Girl

Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche – Notes on Grief

November 27, 2021

Bestsellers 20th – 27th November

by Team Riverside

Frank Herbert – Dune

Piranesi – Susanna Clarke

Harper Lee – To Kill A Mockingbird

Jessica Harrison eds – The Penguin Book of Christmas Stories

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Sosuke Natsukawa – The Cat Who Saved Books

Sarah Moss – The Fell

Noor Murad, Yotam Ottolenghi – Ottolenghi Test Kitchen: Shelf Love

Elena Ferrante – The Lying Life of Adults

John Le Carre – Silverview

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Merlin Sheldrake – Entangled Life

Amor Towles – The Lincoln Highway

Matt Haig – The Midnight Library

November 13, 2021

Bestsellers 6th – 13th November

by Team Riverside

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Susanna Clarke – Piranesi

Frank Herbert – Dune

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Tom Chivers – London Clay

Florence Given – Women Don’t Owe You Pretty

Stanley Tucci – Taste: My Life Through Food

Sosuke Natsukawa – The Cat Who Saved Books

Tim Marshall – The Power of Geography

Various Authors – A Scandinavian Christmas: Festive Tales For a Nordic Noel

Nigel Slater – A Cook’s Book

George Orwell – 1984

November 6, 2021

Bestsellers 30th October – 6th November

by Team Riverside

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Stanley Tucci – Taste: My Life Through Food

Frank Herbert – Dune

Taylor Jenkins Reid – The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Sathnam Sangera – Empireland

Elizabeth Strout – Oh William!

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Damon Galgut – The Promise

Shon Faye – The Transgender Issue

John Le Carre – Silverview

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Bob Mortimer – And Away…

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Abdulrazak Gurnah – Afterlives

October 30, 2021

Bestsellers 23rd – 30th October

by Team Riverside

Frank Herbert – Dune

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Various Authors – A Scandinavian Christmas: Festive Tales For a Nordic Noel

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

John Preston – Fall: The Mystery of Robert Maxwell

Jonathon Franzen – Crossroads

Lea Ypi – Free: Coming of Age at the End of History

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Rutger Bregman – Humankind

Sosuke Natsukawa – The Cat Who Saved Books

Rachel Morrisroe, Steven Lenton – How To Grow a Unicorn

Stephanie Garnier – How to Live Like Your Cat

Ralph Ellison – Invisible Man

John Steinbeck – The Vigilante

Shon Faye – The Transgender Issue

October 29, 2021

There’s a Ghost in this House by Oliver Jeffers

by Team Riverside
There's a Ghost in this House

Hardback, HarperCollins, £20, out now

This is a delightful, mildly spooky picture book from the author of Lost and Found. 

There are supposed to be ghosts in our host’s large old house, but she has never seen them – can you?  With the help of tracing paper inserts and atmospheric photos, we can not only find the ghosts but also see the hijinks that they get up to.

It is a brilliant idea, and a timeless book.  It goes for funny rather than scary, and the ghosts are quite endearing.  You find yourself thinking that living in a haunted house might be quite jolly.

We have signed copies in store.  Happy Halloween!

Review by Bethan

October 23, 2021

Bestsellers 16th-23rd October

by Team Riverside

John le Carre – Silverview

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Stanley Tucci – Taste: My Life Through Food

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Elizabeth Strout – Oh William!

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Elena Ferrante – The Lying Life of Adults

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Suzanna Clarke – Piranesi

Rumaan Alam – Leave The World Behind

Yotam Ottolenghi, Noor Murad – Ottolenghi Test Kitchen: Shelf Love

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Florence Given – Women Don’t Owe You Pretty

Shirley Jackson – The Haunting of Hill House

October 9, 2021

Bestsellers 2nd – 9th October

by Team Riverside

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Karina Lickorish Quinn – The Dust Never Settles

Sosuke Natsukawa – The Cat Who Saved Books

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Shon Faye – The Transgender Issue

Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey – How Was That Built?

Merlin Sheldrake – Entangled Life

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Pat Barker – The Women of Troy

Stanley Tucci – Taste: My Life Through Food

William Boyd – Trio

Richard Osman – The Thursday Murder Club

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Bob Mortimer – And Away…

September 24, 2021

Bestsellers 17th-24th September

by Team Riverside

Sally Rooney – Beautiful World, Where Are You

Suzannah Clarke – Piranesi

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice

Brit Bennett – The Vanishing Half

Caroline Criado Perez – Invisible Women

Bernadine Evaristo – Girl, Woman, Other

Frank Herbert – Dune

John Cooper Clarke – I Wanna Be Yours

Monique Roffey – The Mermaid of Black Conch

Riku Onda – The Aosawa Murders

Colm Toibin – The Magician

Nadifa Mohamed – The Fortune Men

Sally Rooney – Normal People

Eoin McLaughlin – The Hug

Kazuo Ishiguro – Klara and The Sun

September 19, 2021

How Was That Built?

by Team Riverside
How Was That Built window

We were so delighted to welcome the author and illustrator to install a lovely window display for the new children’s book How Was That Built? by Roma Agrawal and Katie Hickey.

We have signed copies and we are so delighted with our window!

September 18, 2021

Mindful Mr Sloth by Katy Hudson

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Raintree and Curious Frog, £6.99, out now

Mindful Mr Sloth

Sasha has an enviable treehouse and a bunch of activities that she’s ready to do at high speed.  She even has lists of books she’s read – including a personal best reading time of 20 seconds!  This is all excellent fun, but when a sloth bonks down on the treehouse roof, she learns that slow can be fun too.

This very appealing children’s picture book shows a lovely day being had while also providing a useful way in to mindfulness (or just to slowing down and paying good attention).  The illustrations themselves provide a great reward for attending: vibrant and cheerful, and little details that repay seeing rather than just looking.

There is a helpful focus on the natural world (and not just sloths), showing that mindfulness and its rewards are possible everywhere.  Offering quiet and stillness as positive ways to enjoy the smell of flowers or the sound of birdsong, rather than just as corrections to what adults consider ‘too much’ noise or activity, is also welcome.

Who would not want to learn mindfulness from a sloth?

Review by Bethan

August 2, 2021

Arlo the Lion Who Couldn’t Sleep by Catherine Rayner

by Team Riverside
cover of Arlo, a picture book

Paperback, Macmillan, £7.99, out now

Lions need a lot of sleep, as everyone knows… but for Arlo it’s too hot, too cold, too prickly, too noisy.  Like everyone who struggles with their sleep, Arlo wonders if he will ever sleep again.

Catherine Rayner’s beautiful picture book sets the tone for a peaceful bedtime for small children.  Arlo’s friend Owl swoops down to offer advice on how to relax and get ready for a restful night.  Rayner’s exquisite pictures with their soothing but still vibrant colour palette give life to a simple and effective bedtime story.  The lions and owl are not cartoon or comic book, but are natural.

As a veteran struggler with sleep, I found this book comforting and helpful (and I am clearly about 40 years over the target audience age).  It’s helpful without being prescriptive or preachy. I would also be delighted to have any or all of these stunning pictures on my wall.

The only potential problem I foresee is tired parents and carers dozing off before any children who are being read to!  It’s a treat for the end of the day.

Review by Bethan

July 20, 2021

We Want Our Books by Jake Alexander

by Team Riverside
We Want Our Books

Hardback, Pan Macmillan, £12.99, out now

Rosa has so many interesting questions that her dad suggests they visit the library to get the answers.  But the library is closed and boarded up, because it’s going to be knocked down and replaced by a restaurant.  There will be no library to provide answers.

In this striking picture book, Rosa and her family do their best to protest against the closure by reminding people of how useful and important libraries are.  But no one seems to listen, as people are either too busy or think that the protest is beneath their notice.

But it turns out that more people care about the library than only Rosa’s family, and that all together they can make a difference.

We Want Our Books is a love letter to libraries and a believable story about the highs and lows of grassroots protest. 

I still get a rush of joy whenever I walk into a public library, when I remember that I can find a book that might change my life and that I can borrow it for free.  And if you need a reminder of how lovely libraries can be, treat yourself to a look here: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/epic-libraries-around-the-world.  Libraries need our support – support yours!

Review by Bethan

June 7, 2021

What Happened to You? by James Catchpole and Karen George

by Team Riverside
What Happened to You?

Paperback, Faber and Faber, £6.99, out now

Joe is having a great time at the playground on his own, battling sharks and crocodiles.  But a new kid comes along and says what new kids always say – “You’ve only got one leg!” and “What happened to you?”.

Joe is super fed up of always getting these questions, and as more kids turn up, more questions (and questionable theories) abound.  But soon the kids discover that there is more interesting stuff they can be doing with Joe… and it involves battling sharks and crocodiles.

This fun and sensitive book provides a great way in to talking about disability with kids, and also has very helpful notes for adults on how to do this when “your child wants to know everything about every disabled person they see, all at once, at TOP VOLUME…”.  Some really good advice follows – “…it’s still worth your child knowing that disabled people are just like anyone else, getting on with their busy day, not looking to be a teachable moment”.  It reminded me of the very excellent blogs by Gem Turner on exactly this topic (https://gemturner.com/explaining-disability-to-children/).

What Happened to You? is a fun and enjoyable read, with lively and cheerful illustrations.  Cracking!

Review by Bethan

May 30, 2021

Lost in the Clouds by Tom Tinn-Disbury

by Team Riverside
Lost in the Clouds

Paperback, DK, £6.99, out now

Lost in the Clouds is a sensitive and useful picture book for young children about bereavement and grief.

Billy knows that his mum has died, and he likes to think of her as a cloud in the sky.  Sometimes Billy’s days with his dad are good, when they can have fun and still feel close to Mummy.  But sometimes the sky is dark and stormy and Mummy feels too distant, and Daddy feels distant too.  On a day just like this, Billy builds a tower to the sky to try to be closer to Mummy.

Warm and evocative illustrations show how grief can feel, and also demonstrate that joy and fun can still happen even amid great loss.

Although the story is from Billy’s perspective, his dad’s difficulties and kindnesses are manifest too.  “Daddy wasn’t quite the same on these days.  He would be quieter and his eyes would always be looking far away, as if he was trying to find Mummy in the distance somewhere”.

There are handy notes and further resources in the back of the book on helping children deal with grief.  For older children and adults, I always recommend Michael Rosen’s classic The Sad Book (https://www.brainpickings.org/2015/08/25/michael-rosens-sad-book-quentin-blake).   There is a very sympathetic cat who pops up throughout Lost in the Clouds, and is especially fine on the back cover, putting a paw out to test the weather for Billy and his dad.

Review by Bethan

April 24, 2021

The Rock from the Sky by Jon Klassen

by Team Riverside
The Rock from the Sky

Hardback, Walker Books, £12.99, out now

This excellent picture book has possibly my top back cover text ever: “There is a spot.  It is the perfect spot to stand.  But somewhere above there is also a rock.  A rock from the sky”.

The Rock from the Sky is new from Jon Klassen, author of Riverside all-time-favourite the Hat Trilogy (https://riversidebookshop.co.uk/2016/11/30/we-found-a-hat-by-jon-klassen/). There really is a rock from the sky with dramatic consequences (Chekhov’s rock, perhaps).  Some characters will be familiar… I think this is one of the turtles from We Found a Hat.  Although it may be a different turtle in a similar hat.  It is hard to say.

There are shades of Wes Anderson in the title cards for each section.  It is also stuffed with very quotable lines.  The turtle picks a spot to stand in. “What do you think of my spot?” “Actually I have a bad feeling about it”.    “A bad feeling?”.  “Yes”.

Funny, relatable, memorable.  I love it.

Review by Bethan

April 20, 2021

Weirdo by Zadie Smith and Nick Laird

by Team Riverside
Weirdo book cover

Hardback, Penguin, £12.99, out now

Maud the guinea pig loves judo.  She’s only just arrived at Kit’s house, as a surprise birthday present.  But Kit’s other pets aren’t impressed – they’ve got a schedule to stick to and it doesn’t include her.  One of them calls her a weirdo … but what is a weirdo, and is she one?

Luckily Maud happens upon the very cheerful Emily Brookstein, who tells her that “life’s too short not to be a weirdo”.

This excellent picture book has wonderful illustrations, colourful and joyous, by Magenta Fox.   Zadie Smith is best known as a ground-breaking novelist and essayist (her book of essays, Intimations, has been one of our bestsellers of the last year).  Nick Laird is a novelist and poet, also usually writing for adults.

A kind and ultimately happy book about embracing your differences and life being much more interesting for everyone as a result.  Just lovely.

Review by Bethan

October 13, 2020

Tiger, Tiger, Burning Bright! ed. Fiona Walters and illustrations Britta Teckentrup

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Nosy Crow, £25, out now

Tiger, Tiger, Burning Bright! book cover

This gorgeous anthology of animal poems for children has just arrived, and it is a complete joy.  There’s a poem for every day, varying from the funny to the serious, and the short to the reasonably epic.  There are poets here I recognise and many that I do not.  This book is ostensibly for children, but like the best children’s books is really for all humans.

For autumn, a spider poem by Bashō:

                            With what voice,

And what song would you sing, spider,

                            In this autumn breeze?

The Britta Teckentrup illustrations are vivid and engaging.  We at Riverside are massive fans of her work, especially the stunning Under the Same Sky (https://riversidebookshop.co.uk/2018/01/16/under-the-same-sky-by-britta-teckentrup/). 

This is a book to keep and share forever.  It’s big, and heavy, and perfect for curling up with on a chilly autumn evening.

Review by Bethan

September 9, 2020

Look Up! by Nathan Bryon, illustrated by Dapo Adeola

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Penguin, £6.99, out now

This is a cheerful picture book about a small girl’s mission to share her love of space.  Rocket is a stargazer who lives in a town, and is determined that folks where she lives should come to the park to watch the meteor shower.

Rocket’s brother Jamal is lovely but he’s always looking down at his phone… like everyone else, he needs to look up!

With a shout out to the legendary Mae Jemison, Look Up! is a great way to show primary children how exciting space can be, and that it’s available to everyone.  The enthusiasm in the book is infectious, helped by the lively and fun illustrations.  I particularly liked the astronaut cat who appears on every page.  I’ve already bought three copies as presents, and I’m pretty sure these won’t be the last.     

Review by Bethan

July 19, 2020

Meesha Makes Friends by Tom Percival

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Bloomsbury, £6.99, out nowTom Perceval MEESHA MAKES FRIENDS

Meesha has a loving family and a joyful and creative spirit, but she finds it hard to make friends.  This latest picture book in Tom Percival’s Big Bright Feelings series deals with this common experience sensitively and with helpful practical suggestions.

Appropriate for infants and up, the gorgeous illustrations show how the world can be a little monochrome when we feel alone.  Meesha makes her own toy friends out of bits and pieces, but finds that while they are very compliant, they are not much fun to play catch with!

The feelings of being alone in a crowd, and of lacking the skills to get involved with what other children are enjoying, are explored in an accessible way than many (including adults) will be able to relate to.

When someone takes a risk to come and talk to Meesha, will she be able to take a chance and involve him in her games?  The author gives us handy hints: “… if you ever see someone who looks a little bit ‘on-their-own’, try to include them.  Ask them what they like to do.  You never know, it might be something that YOU love to do as well, and you might just have met your new best friend!”

A kind and useful book.  If you like this, I also recommend Ruby’s Worry, an excellent book by the same author about getting help when the worry monster visits.

Review by Bethan

February 12, 2020

We Love You, Mr Panda by Steve Antony

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Hodder Children’s Books, £6.99, out nowSteve Antony WE LOVE YOU MR PANDA

The legendary Mr Panda returns.

As ever he is long on kindness and manners, and short on rudeness and entitled behaviour.

This time he is offering free hugs (after checking first with each potential recipient).  He is all ready to hug a smelly skunk and a potentially bitey crocodile.  But everyone would seem to prefer to hug someone else.  It is a difficult moment when you realise that perhaps no-one wants to hug you.  But maybe someone will offer Mr Panda a hug instead?

Engaging bright pictures and a relatable character make this a great addition to a winning series.  This perfect Valentine’s gift is guaranteed to raise a smile.

Review by Bethan

February 11, 2020

The Missing – The True Story of My Family by Michael Rosen

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Walker, £8.99, out nowMichael Rosen THE MISSING

Great-Uncle Oscar, Great-Aunt Rachel, Great-Uncle Martin and other family members were missing from Michael Rosen’s post-war childhood.  Although those who had disappeared were spoken of, there was mystery around what had happened to them.  (A poem for Oscar and Rachel is available at https://michaelrosenblog.blogspot.com/2019/01/clockmender-oscar-rosen-and-his-wife.html).  For Rosen, some of the mysteries were not resolved until he was doing the research which formed this book.

This outstanding short book is written for children aged about ten and up, as well as adults.  It is a useful and appropriate way to start talking about the Holocaust with children.  He tells his family story through accessible and moving prose interspersed with his poems.  In a moving interview in the Guardian, he talks about the long impact of the silence about those who were missing (https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2019/dec/28/michael-rosen-family-history-jewish-culture).  As the article notes: “Unusually, the book is aimed at children aged 10 and over, as well as adults. Rosen decided to write it that way after visiting a school where a pupil denied the Holocaust to his face. “This young man put up his hand and said: ‘It didn’t happen, did it?’” As the teacher panicked, Rosen remembers counting to three and patiently saying: ‘Well, no, it did happen.’”

Rosen shares original family letters, postcards and photos which make the stories even more compelling, and show readers that you can do your own research about things that are important to you.  You don’t need to be a specialist.

Fans of Rosen’s work will meet people they remember: his memorable childhood friend Harrybo; his beloved father; and his grandfather (who turns out to be the inspiration for this excellent poem from You Tell Me http://bepalmer.blogspot.com/2012/05/).  I had this book as a child.  I can remember so many of those poems now.

One of the things that makes the book truly exceptional is the framing of the stories as being absolutely similar to stories of current refugees.  “This story is about things that happened to my family a long time ago, back when photos and films were in black and white.  But when I think about it, my relatives were refugees – a lot like the people you may have seen on the news recently…  So I hope this book becomes part of a bigger conversation about the refugee crisis.  About how to find fair and decent ways of helping people like my relatives” (p. 5).   Deep humanity emerges from the book which contrasts with the inhumanity that caused the deaths of all these much-missed people.  This makes The Missing both beautiful and essential reading right now.

Review by Bethan

January 4, 2020

The Wolf the Duck and the Mouse written by Mac Barnett and illustrated by Jon Klassen

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Walker Books, £6.99, out nowBarnett and Klassen THE WOLF THE DUCK AND THE MOUSE

This is a very funny picture book, suitable for all humans.  The wolf eats the mouse, who quickly discovers that a duck (a previous wolf-dinner) is already living a very nice life inside the wolf.  They become fast friends and enjoy dinners and dancing in their new home.  This internal party time is less fun for the wolf, however…

It’s worth reading this book for the expressions on the animals’ faces alone.  There are many dramatic developments and they are delivered with great style.

This team have produced several excellent books, but this is my favourite so far.  Here at Riverside we are also massive fans of Jon Klassen’s Hat trilogy (https://riversidebookshop.co.uk/2016/11/30/we-found-a-hat-by-jon-klassen/).          Read this book and feel your life improve immediately.

Review by Bethan

November 13, 2019

Wolf in the Snow by Matthew Cordell

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Andersen Press, £6.99, out nowMatthew Cordell WOLF IN THE SNOW

Wolf in the Snow is an adventurous and heart-warming winter story.  Told through pictures, with almost all of the words being the sounds made by the human and non-human animals, this is an instantly engaging story.

A little girl in a red coat leaves her school just as a blizzard is starting.  As the snow becomes heavier, she finds a wolf cub who has accidentally become separated from their pack.  She tries to get the cub back to the pack, and will not abandon it.  But when she becomes lost, will anyone be able to find her and bring her home?

Like all the best children’s books, this is appropriate for every age.  I’m not surprised that it won the Caldecott medal.  I love that the author’s note at the beginning includes: “thanks to Kira Cassidy of the Yellowstone Wolf Project for taking the time to answer my questions about wolves and wolf behaviour”.  The wolves and humans manage to be equally relatable, which is a remarkable achievement.  It also has lovely messages about connection, taking risks to help others, love and friendship.  A perfect gift book for winter, if you can bear to give it away.

Review by Bethan

March 12, 2019

Hair, it’s a Family Affair! by Mylo Freeman and The Mega Magic Hair Swap! by Rochelle Humes and Rachel Suzanne

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Cassava Republic, £6.99 out now; Paperback, Studio Press, £6.99, out nowMega Magic Hair Swap and Hair it's a Family Affair

These are two gorgeous picture books for young children celebrating how different hair can be.

Hair, it’s a Family Affair! is from Princess Arabella author Mylo Freeman, and has the same style of bright and joyous illustrations fans will recognise from those books (we are particular fans of Princess Arabella’s Birthday).  We get to see Grandma’s amazing Afro from the past, and cousin Kiki’s hair that is sometimes purple and sometimes pink.  Even Dad’s hair is feted, though he doesn’t really have any…

In The Mega Magic Hair Swap! two friends get their wish to exchange their hair.  It’s very relatable for any curly haired person who has envied the straight swooshy hair of friends.  But the baby no longer recognises his sister and even Tiger the dog runs away.  Will the magic coconut grant the girls’ wish to go back to how they were before?

Two bright and lively books showing how our different hairstyles help make us who we are.

Review by Bethan

March 9, 2019

World Book Day 2019!

by Team Riverside

Come and spend your World Book Day vouchers with us!  We have all the good things.

World Book Day 2019

January 8, 2019

Luna Loves Library Day by Joseph Coelho and Fiona Lumbers

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Andersen Press, £6.99, out nowcoelho and lumbers luna loves library day

Luna’s mum drops her off at the library, where Dad meets her and they have an adventurous day!

This beautiful picture book for young children shows libraries to be exciting and safe places.  It celebrates all different kinds of reading, and there is even a bonus miniature story book set inside so you can read along with Luna and Dad as they have an enjoyable cuddle while reading together.

There are light touch mentions of young children whose parents are separated, and what comes after.  The lively illustrations show a dual heritage family.  Endorsed by Amnesty International, this is a gorgeous positive book that makes even adult readers want to get back to their local library.

Review by Bethan

July 28, 2018

Julian is a Mermaid by Jessica Love

by Team Riverside

Jessica Love JULIAN IS A MERMAIDHardback, Walker Books, £11.99, out now

Julian is a small boy on the subway with his Nana… but he is also a mermaid.  After seeing three gorgeous women dressed up as mermaids on the journey, he tells Nana: “Nana, I am also a mermaid”.  Julian dresses himself up as a mermaid while Nana is in the bath.  He feels wonderful… but how will Nana react?

This is a stunningly illustrated picture book, with a joyous message at its heart.  The colour and life in the pictures make you want to look and look, from the kids playing in the water from the hydrant to the older ladies swimming in the pool.

If you want a book with a superb grandparent in, this would also do the job!  As with the best picture books, this is one for all humans, not only small children.  Read Julian is a Mermaid and feel part of the kindness and delight that it celebrates.

Review by Bethan